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Southsea : parcs et nature

Parc
“Southsea Common is adjacent to the seafront promenade and beach, a large open space perfect for picnics!”
10 personnes du coin recommandent
Parc
“Victoria Park is a public park located just to the north of Portsmouth Guildhall, adjacent to Portsmouth and Southsea railway station and close to the city centre in Portsmouth, Hampshire. It was officially opened on 25 May 1878 and was the first public park to be opened in Portsmouth. It was designed by Alexander McKenzie. It has a total area of around 15 acres (61,000 m2) and is planted with trees, shrubs and flowers. The centre of the park features an enclosed area which inhabits animals such as birds, rabbits and guinea pigs.”
5 personnes du coin recommandent
Parc
2 personnes du coin recommandent
Lake
“Great for a picnic, a game of mini golf a ride on the swan pedalos or just an ice cream!”
2 personnes du coin recommandent
Lake
“A few minutes walk from Southsea Studios is Canoe Lake. Fun for all guests. Pedal boats available for hire in the Summer months. Theres a nice cafe on the outskirts of the lake. Plenty of green areas for picnics and a childrens play area. ”
2 personnes du coin recommandent
Parc
“Outdoor park with concrete rinks, ramps & rails, for skateboards, BMXs, scooters and roller blades. Mini-wheeler sessions. Roller Disco summer sessions with the best DJs and live music. There are helmets, skates, skateboards and a limited number of scooters available to hire at reasonable rates. Please note that they recommend all users to wear helmets and all under 16s must do so. The iconic image of the skatepark is the bandstand, situated in the centre of the skatepark and built in 1928 as a traditional bandstand, surrounded by grass. In the 1930s a paved area was laid around the bandstand for dancing and for roller skating, surrounded by a low fence. Southsea Skatepark is arguably the oldest skatepark in the World, with the current ‘rink’ area dating back to a roller rink that was first built back in the 1950s. Back in the 70s and 80s the rink was only used for roller hockey. The skatepark was remodelled in the 1970s with concrete (bowls, snakerun, etc) and then modified again in 1990 with a new bowl replacing the old reservoir. In the mid to late 90s the rink area was built on with new ledges, banks, rails and ramps and in the last ten years two new mini ramps and a replacement vert ramp have been built. "We’re possibly the oldest and most iconic Skatepark in the UK – and celebrated our 40th birthday last year! We open all year round and welcome everyone from beginners to pros. Since 2011, Southsea Skatepark has been run as a charity. Every penny we raise goes towards improving the park and it’s facilities." The skatepark periodically holds contests catering for BMX, inline, scooters and skateboarding. BMX shop on site. Southsea Skatepark reflects it’s age, mixing the legendary concrete from the 70s as one of the first skateparks in the UK , with the contemporary street/park section, which includes a state of the art vert ramp, spine mini, and a 4ft metal mini around by the cafe. Southsea Skatepark covers a range of styles, from the snake run bowl that encourages carving and creative lines to the pool slalom run bowl that has just had a small box jump added to the top of the run. Next there's the mogul and keyhole bowl that link together and have brought so much history to the park, it’s fair to say visitors come and go and respect anything done in the keyhole bowl which is approx 16ft deep. It definitely adds that legit tag to anything you can do in it. What was originally the banked freestyle kick turn area, has now had a state of the art 14ft high / 40ft wide vert ramp with skate lite surface added. Next to the vert (surrounding the iconic bandstand) there's a flat bank hip and pyramid grind rail that flows into a 4ft hip into the skate rink.”
2 personnes du coin recommandent
Pool
1 personne du coin recommande
Lake
1 personne du coin recommande
Parc
1 personne du coin recommande
Parc
“Beside Canoe Lake, St Helen's Parade, Southsea. Here you can find a small water play area adjacent to the adventure playground - set beside the Model Village and opposite Greens Cafe. There's no pool here but plenty of water jets to dart in and out of - and lots of fun. There's plenty of seating for adults and you're close to the Natural History Museum and a choice of cafes. FREE admission. ”
1 personne du coin recommande
Parc
“The Cenotaph in the Guildhall Square comprises of two memorials - one to the dead of World War I and one to the dead of World War II. It is accessible at all times. The World War I Memorial includes two sculptures of machine gunners by Charles Sargeant Jagger (1885-1934), an artist who was a veteran of WW1 and a recipient of the Military Cross. He was wounded at Gallipoli, and again, near-fatally during the Western Front campaign of 1918. PEACE OR CONFLICT MEMORIAL. This white stone plaque on the pedestal to the North Gunner was paid for by Portsmouth City Council and unveiled on 6 November 2003 by Mrs Madeleine Dunn who heads the Portsmouth War Widows. THE WORLD WAR I MEMORIAL Preparations for the construction of the Cenotaph began almost as soon as the Great War ended, but it was not until 1920 that invitations to subscribe to the cost were made. A list of all who donated money and the amounts they gave is held at the Central Library in Guildhall Square. At the same time, local people were asked to nominate the service persons whose names should appear on the memorial, the criteria being 'That the man was born in Portsmouth, (or) that he resided in Portsmouth when the war began, (or) that his home was in Portsmouth when the war began'. Great stress was laid on the concept that 'Not a single name should be omitted', however a perusal of the local parishioners memorials shows a considerable discrepancy on this matter. THE WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL For 60 years following the end of World War II the only memorial to the men and women who lost their lives was a low stone wall at the rear of the Cenotaph with the words 'IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN WORLD WAR II 1939 - 1945' inscribed upon it. On 8th November 2005 a new WWII memorial was unveiled by Princess Alexandra. That this memorial should exist at all is almost wholly down to the dogged determination of Jean Louth whose father Harry Short had died on the beaches of Dunkirk. It was Jean Louth with the help of organisations such as the Normandy Veterans Association and the Portsmouth South Branch of the Royal British Legion who lobbied for funds to raise this memorial. This though was only the first phase as Jean was determined that the names of those who died should be included on the memorial and it took a further eight years to raise the funds necessary to inscribe and raise the twelve panels of names.”
1 personne du coin recommande
Parc
“Milton Locks, in the far east of Milton at the end of the eponymous Locksway Road, is located at the Langstone Harbour entrance of the abandoned Portsmouth and Arundel Canal which began operations in 1822. Little now remains of the old lock gates, wooden as they were, although the infrastructure is still evident. There are several pubs located along the former canal path, partly delineating its route towards Landport where it ended at the eponymously named Arundel Street. Traces of the canal survive further into central Portsmouth, as the railway line from Fratton to Portsmouth and Southsea railway station, runs along the earlier canal bed. This can be most easily seen from a street called Canal Walk, just off Fratton Bridge. Part of the former Portsmouth and Arundel Canal was located directly south of Middle Farm (later Milton Park) which was built across Portsea Island to Landport. When the canal closed in the middle of the nineteenth century, the section in Milton was filled in to form a new main road along the route of the canal, and was named Goldsmith Avenue after the local land owning Goldsmith family.”
1 personne du coin recommande
Port/Marina
1 personne du coin recommande