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Visites touristiques et monuments à Metropolitan City of Rome

Musées d'art

Musée d'art
“The Vatican Museums begin just beyond a massive bronze door that, like magic, takes you out of Italy and into the smallest country in the world: the Vatican. There are priceless works of art here, collected by the popes or often expressly commissioned by them. More than 70,000 pieces are on exhibition in over 42,000 square meters, with another 50,000 pieces preserved in the vaults and storerooms. Forget about seeing everything in a single visit: it simply can't be done. To the millions of visitors that come here from every part of the globe to admire these marvels, the whole complex seems to be one gigantic museum but the Vatican Museums, with their full name "Papal Museums and Galleries", are the Museum of Museums, the result of the union of various collections, collections that often take the name of the pope that began them. The most sought-after stop on the Vatican Museum trail is without doubt the Sistine Chapel however every room is rich in history and precious examples of life from every era. The birth of the Museum was almost by chance: it all began in 1506, when an ancient sculpture was found in a vineyard on the Esquiline Hill near Nero's Domus Aurea. It was only later that it was recognized as one of the most famous statues ever: the Laocoonte, described even by the Latin author Pliny. The subject of the work is taken from an episode of Virgil's Aeneid in which the seer and priest Laocoonte, for having predicted Ulysses' use of the Trojan Horse, was punished by the gods who sent two enormous snakes to strangle him and his two children in their deadly coils. Like all the pontiffs, Pope Julius II had always shown great interest in artwork, and he immediately summoned Michelangelo and Giuliano da Sangallo to authenticate the sculpture. The pope then decided to acquire it, making sure no one else could do so before he did. So the dramatic Laocoonte was put on exhibit in the Vatican, enriching Pope Julius II's collection that was the seed of what would ultimately become the Vatican Museums. The Laocoonte was placed in Bramante's Belvedere Courtyard where Julius II grouped all his ancient statuary, transforming it into the "Courtyard of the Statues". Visitors came from all over the world just to admire the sculptures and artists stopped there to copy the masterworks. The Museums as they appear today, were created in the second half of the 18th century and are made up of two parts: the actual Museum and the popes palaces, naturally only the portions open to the public. The visit is an incredible stroll through the history of art where you can meet the greatest artists ever, through their most important works. You can organize your visit according to the time you have at your disposal; the shortest takes at least two hours, the longest, around six. You'll discover masterpieces in a sort of crescendo as you pass from one room to another; in fact, the rooms themselves are works of art, frescoed by artists like Fra Angelico, Pinturicchio or Raphael. The Vatican Museums: The courtyard of the Pinecone Chiaramonti Gallery Braccio Nuovo Pio-Clementino Museum Octagonal Courtyard Apoxyomenos Apollo del Belvedere Laocoonte Galleries of the statues Belvedere Torso The round hall Sala a Croce Greca Gregorian Egyptian Museum Gregorian Etruscan Museum Gallery of the Candelabra Gallery of Tapestries Gallery of Maps Sala Sobieski Raphael’s rooms Hall of Constantine Room of Heliodorus Room of the Segnatura Room of the fire in the Borgo Sala dei Chiaroscuri Cappella Niccolina Appartamento Borgia The Sistine Chapel The ceiling Last Judgment Musei della Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Pinacoteca Vaticana Museo Gregoriano Profano Museo Pio Cristiano ”
  • 453 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“Located on Capitoline Hill, the Capitoline Museums are considered the oldest museum in the world. ”
  • 61 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“THE IMPORTANT AND BEAUTIFUL BASILIC OF S. PETER, S. PETER - MICHELANGELO DOME, THE COLONNADE, THE OBELUSK AND S.PETER SQUARE .”
  • 94 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“The Palazzo delle Esposizioni is an exhibition site. It’s the largest interdisciplinary exhibition space in the center of Rome, at over 10,000 square meters. The space is distributed over two floors and features a smart system for artificial light that mechanically adapts according to the artworks exhibited. ”
  • 64 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“Designed by Donato Bramante (a rival of Michelangelo) the chiostro or cloister was once the centre of a Renaissance monastery. After careful restoration, this elegant complex is now used for some of the city’s best and most popular exhibitions.”
  • 61 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“The Centrale Montemartini Museum presents marble statues from the Capitoline Collection set against the backdrop of preserve turbines, diesel engines and steam boilers to create one of the most thought-provoking museum spaces Rome has to offer.”
  • 69 personnes du coin recommandent
Museum
“One of the most beatifull museum in Rome, incredible view and usually you can see the best exibitions of the main important artists of the world.”
  • 30 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“Villa Farnesina, located in Rome (Trastevere), is considered one of the noblest and most harmonious creations of Italian Renaissance”
  • 42 personnes du coin recommandent

Musées d'histoire

Musée d'art
“The Vatican Museums begin just beyond a massive bronze door that, like magic, takes you out of Italy and into the smallest country in the world: the Vatican. There are priceless works of art here, collected by the popes or often expressly commissioned by them. More than 70,000 pieces are on exhibition in over 42,000 square meters, with another 50,000 pieces preserved in the vaults and storerooms. Forget about seeing everything in a single visit: it simply can't be done. To the millions of visitors that come here from every part of the globe to admire these marvels, the whole complex seems to be one gigantic museum but the Vatican Museums, with their full name "Papal Museums and Galleries", are the Museum of Museums, the result of the union of various collections, collections that often take the name of the pope that began them. The most sought-after stop on the Vatican Museum trail is without doubt the Sistine Chapel however every room is rich in history and precious examples of life from every era. The birth of the Museum was almost by chance: it all began in 1506, when an ancient sculpture was found in a vineyard on the Esquiline Hill near Nero's Domus Aurea. It was only later that it was recognized as one of the most famous statues ever: the Laocoonte, described even by the Latin author Pliny. The subject of the work is taken from an episode of Virgil's Aeneid in which the seer and priest Laocoonte, for having predicted Ulysses' use of the Trojan Horse, was punished by the gods who sent two enormous snakes to strangle him and his two children in their deadly coils. Like all the pontiffs, Pope Julius II had always shown great interest in artwork, and he immediately summoned Michelangelo and Giuliano da Sangallo to authenticate the sculpture. The pope then decided to acquire it, making sure no one else could do so before he did. So the dramatic Laocoonte was put on exhibit in the Vatican, enriching Pope Julius II's collection that was the seed of what would ultimately become the Vatican Museums. The Laocoonte was placed in Bramante's Belvedere Courtyard where Julius II grouped all his ancient statuary, transforming it into the "Courtyard of the Statues". Visitors came from all over the world just to admire the sculptures and artists stopped there to copy the masterworks. The Museums as they appear today, were created in the second half of the 18th century and are made up of two parts: the actual Museum and the popes palaces, naturally only the portions open to the public. The visit is an incredible stroll through the history of art where you can meet the greatest artists ever, through their most important works. You can organize your visit according to the time you have at your disposal; the shortest takes at least two hours, the longest, around six. You'll discover masterpieces in a sort of crescendo as you pass from one room to another; in fact, the rooms themselves are works of art, frescoed by artists like Fra Angelico, Pinturicchio or Raphael. The Vatican Museums: The courtyard of the Pinecone Chiaramonti Gallery Braccio Nuovo Pio-Clementino Museum Octagonal Courtyard Apoxyomenos Apollo del Belvedere Laocoonte Galleries of the statues Belvedere Torso The round hall Sala a Croce Greca Gregorian Egyptian Museum Gregorian Etruscan Museum Gallery of the Candelabra Gallery of Tapestries Gallery of Maps Sala Sobieski Raphael’s rooms Hall of Constantine Room of Heliodorus Room of the Segnatura Room of the fire in the Borgo Sala dei Chiaroscuri Cappella Niccolina Appartamento Borgia The Sistine Chapel The ceiling Last Judgment Musei della Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Pinacoteca Vaticana Museo Gregoriano Profano Museo Pio Cristiano ”
  • 453 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“Located on Capitoline Hill, the Capitoline Museums are considered the oldest museum in the world. ”
  • 61 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“THE IMPORTANT AND BEAUTIFUL BASILIC OF S. PETER, S. PETER - MICHELANGELO DOME, THE COLONNADE, THE OBELUSK AND S.PETER SQUARE .”
  • 94 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“You can visit this underground and incredibly intact 2000-year old ruin. See such vivid paintings and well-excavated rooms. Ancient artwork, and the octagonal room with oculus in the ceiling that was so clearly a precursor to the Pantheon. ”
  • 63 personnes du coin recommandent
Musée d'art
“The Palazzo delle Esposizioni is an exhibition site. It’s the largest interdisciplinary exhibition space in the center of Rome, at over 10,000 square meters. The space is distributed over two floors and features a smart system for artificial light that mechanically adapts according to the artworks exhibited. ”
  • 64 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“Il sito Archeologico di Ostia Antica è uno degli itinerari turistici più famosi e consigliati ai turisti che visitano Roma. E' tra le attrazioni turistiche più belle e più visitate ed è la più vicina ad Ostia. Imperdibile/The archaeological site of Ostia Antica is one of the most famous tourist itineraries and recommended for tourists visiting Rome. It is among the most beautiful and most visited tourist attractions and is the closest to Ostia. Unmissable.”
  • 75 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“A very unique and interesting experience in Rome, not so popular as Coliseum and Vatican, but definetely worth visit! Especially if you are a fan of grotesque places! ;)”
  • 57 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“catacombs of the early Christian period (built between the second and fifth centuries after Christ) placed on the consular road of Salaria. Valuable stone paintings depicting the virgin with the prophets.”
  • 41 personnes du coin recommandent

Points de vue pittoresques

Belvédère
“Giardino degli Aranci (Parco Savello) The tranquil Garden of Oranges, also known as Parco Savello, affords fantastic views of the many monuments, roof tops and domes of Rome, encapsulating flavors of the modern and medieval on its shady walkways. The park itself fits neatly behind the ancient Basilica of Santa Sabina, and beside the Piazza Pietro d'Illiria, named after the founder of the church. Visitors to this secluded square are greeted by the scowling face of Giacomo Della Porta's fountain, perhaps made in reference to Oceanus, a River god. The mask had several previous locations, including the Forum and Lungotevere Gianicolense, before coming to rest on the peaceful Aventine Hill. To the side of the garden are the remains of a wall which once surrounded the Tenth Century Savelli Castle. Built by Alberico II, and inherited by Ottone IIIafter the first Millennium, it was later given to the Dominican Order, who transformed the castle into a monastery, and the small park into a vegetable garden. Legends surrounding Spanish Saint Dominic gave the garden its name, and its first orange tree: having transported the sapling from his homeland, he planted it close to the cloister where it flourished. Legend tells how Saint Catherine of Siena picked the oranges from this tree and made candied fruit, which she gave to Pope Urban VI. The tree remains to this day, visible through a "porthole" in the wall of the nave. Miraculously, a younger sapling grew on its remains, which continues to bear fruit. Years later, orange trees were added to the monastery garden, which became known as the Garden of Oranges. Though they produce bitter fruit, they give a pleasant shady air to the garden, affording a lovely retreat from the bustle and noise of urban life. The garden's present form is the result of the work of architect Raffaele de Vico, creator of many of Rome's "green spaces". Upon entering the Garden of Oranges, the ancient apse of the Basilica of Santa Sabina appears, while, on the opposite side, scanty remains of the old Savelli fortress, drawbridge and towers are visible. The garden was designed on a symmetrical plan, drawing visitors ever closer to the central walkway leading to the terrace. A couple of steps forward offers a fantastic panorama of the Tevere, the ancient temples of the Forum Boarium, Santa Maria in Cosmedin (where the Mouth of Truth is found) the Gianicolo, and the imposing dome of St. Peter's from afar. During the summer it is no surprise that the garden is the choice setting for theatrical productions, a favorite resting spot for visitors touring Rome and the haunt of lovers. Perhaps the inspiring view and romantic ambience offers the ideal prompt for falling at the feet of one's beloved!”
  • 168 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“Pro Tip: Don't sit on the steps, or the guards will yell at you! The surrounding area is full of high-end fashion stores as well.”
  • 56 personnes du coin recommandent
Belvédère
“The best view of the historical center from the top of the Gianicolo hill, just behind the building”
  • 43 personnes du coin recommandent
Belvédère
“The most breathtaking view of the city up to the far hills in a green area where we can remember our Unity story, after many centuries when we were split into many states. It is a very nice walking, and there is a merry go round for kids as well and some other surprises. Every day at midday a cannon shots to tell everybody the correct time. (in the past there were not so many watches!). Wondeful at sunset.”
  • 26 personnes du coin recommandent
Place
“The Pincian Hill’s beautiful sights, huge parks and famous rooftop terrace create one of the most peaceful and interesting places to visit in Rome.”
  • 17 personnes du coin recommandent
Belvédère
“Knights of Malta (Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta) Not far from the complex of Sant'Anselmo, high on the Aventine Hill, via di Santa Sabina opens onto the quiet Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta. Bordered by a high wall, decorated with neoclassical obelisks and military trophies, it leads to a famous and fascinating broad wooden door. Known affectionately by Romans as the "Hole of Rome" its abiding attraction draws queues of visitors to this peaceable "out of the way" spot. No key is required: it is sufficient to put an open eye to the keyhole, and focus. With kaleidoscope charm, a vision of St Peter's dome (affectionately known to Romans as the "Cuppolone") perfectly in perspective, framed by the tops of trees in the foreground, opens up. Often wrapped in a thin mysterious mist, seems to stand at the end of the garden path, just beyond the door. Originally, the area was the site of a fortified Palace belonging to Alberico II. In 939 it became a Benedictine monastery run by the abbot Oddone of Cluny. In the Twelfth Century, it passed into the hands of the Knights Templar the famous warrior monks, who in 1312, were violently suppressed by Pope Clement V. The monastery then became the seat of a priory belonging to the Gerosolimitani (known as The Knights Hospitaller). In the second half of the 1400's, Pope Paul II granted the monastery to the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, The numerous owners the building has had during its varied history, correspond to the changes in its structure. At the end of the Sixteen Hundreds, CardinalBenedict Pamphilj even transformed it into a coffee house which, for a spell, became a popular haunt of artists. The present structure is the work of the famous architect and engraver Giovanni Battista Piranesi who restored the building in the second half of the 1700's. The Aventine Hill had always been compared to a ship, and since the time of the Knights Templars, it was said to be ready to raise anchor, catch the tide of the Tevere, and set sail for the Holy Land. Building on this popular idea, Piranesi's construction of the complex combined this sea-going theme with the memory and myths of the Templars. The obelisks in the square represent masts, whilst the shrubbery and labyrinth of gardens beyond the door, denotes the ship's ropes. All Piranesi's decorations and architecture is symbolic and rich in mysterious esoteric meanings relating mainly to Masonry, comprehensible only to those who possessed the right key reading. The garden's decorative fountain is surrounded by impressive archeological remains and a well, engraved with the date 1244. Beyond the magical door and its bewitching view, the complex holds the church of Santa Maria del Priorato, also known as Santa Maria Aventina, and a Villa, whose rooms are filled with portraits and valuable paintings.”
  • 17 personnes du coin recommandent
Belvédère
“E' il simbolo del nostro quartiere, ottimo per una passeggiata. - It's the symbol of our neighborhood, great for a walk.”
  • 14 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“The church of the Santissima Trinità dei Monti, often called merely the Trinità dei Monti, beautiful staircase and square Barcaccia”
  • 4 personnes du coin recommandent

Sites historiques

Lieu historique
“Amphitheatrum Flavium is the most famous and impressive monument of ancient Rome, as well as the largest amphitheater in the world. ”
  • 544 personnes du coin recommandent
Monuments/Sites célèbres
“Only 8 min walk from Domus Viola! Dedicated to all the gods, the Pantheon was one of the greatest temples of ancient Rome.”
  • 287 personnes du coin recommandent
Château
“just 5 minutes walking from our structure you can admire Castel Sant Angelo that its one of the most important Rome's attraction. you can take a ticket for admire the interior or you can just admire from the outside, on the bridge in front of the castle, propely on the tiber.”
  • 344 personnes du coin recommandent
Église
“It's the largest of the four papal basilicas of Rome, known throughout the world.”
  • 259 personnes du coin recommandent
Place
“Piazza del Popolo Between the elegant Pincio, and the banks of the Tevere, Piazza del Popolo yawns into an enormous ellipse. Churches, fountains, monuments, and marble memoirs of historic events in Rome both ancient and modern tastefully embellish the square. Since antiquity, the city's Northern entrance formed a vestibule into the city through the gate in the Aurelian Walls. Though now known as Porta del Popolo, it has had various names over the centuries. Originally called Porta Flaminia by the Emperor Aurelianus who commissioned its construction, during the Early Medieval period, it was called Porta San Valentino, after the nearest Catacomb. Finally the name Porta del Popolo was agreed on, as the church adjoining the gate is Santa Maria del Popolo. Piazza del Popolo itself was known as Piazza del Trullo in the Middle Ages, after the conical fountain which once stood in the centre of the square, reminiscent of a characteristic South-Italian dwelling. Its present name may be due to the poplar tree, known in Latin as "populus" which also meant people, an apt association, as various public events such as fairs, games and dramatic executions were held there. For centuries Piazza del Popolo had a public fountain, a horse trough and a cistern for washerwomen. It was Sixtus V, in 1589, who turned his attention to the square. The Trullo fountain, under the supervision and workmanship of Domenico Fontana, was to be replaced with the Egyptian obelisk of Ramesses II, second in age and height only to the one in San Giovanni,originally brought to the city by the Emperor Augustus, and put in Circus Maximus. Its transportation and installation in Piazza del Popolo gave the square a more regal, less domestic air. Four lions water basin, were added to the obelisk in 1823, during the reign of Pope Leo XII. The next event to prompt work on Piazza del Popolo was the arrival of the Swedish Queen Christina. Desiring to convert to Roman Catholicism, she arrived to Rome in 1655, to a splendid Roman welcome: coming from the North, her first vision was through Porta del Popolo. Bernini had been commissioned to restore the inner façade of the ancient gate in preparation for her arrival. A plaque was placed above the arch, reading: "FELICI FAUSTOQUE INGRESSUI MDCLV" (For a Happy and Propitious Entrance) which remains to this day. Her entrance was so "felicitous" that she never left Rome again. Towards the end of the Seventeen Hundreds, amid the Napoleonic invasion, the ever increasing flood of visitors and pilgrims, descending on Rome through Porta del Popolo, prompted the decision to modernize the square. Till the Eighteen Hundreds, the square had a trapezoidal form which converged on the gate. During the Napoleonic epoch, the French Prefect, Tournon, was head of the "Commission of Embellishments" in Rome. He commissioned Valadier, a Roman architect, to redesign Piazza del Popolo, which he did to stunning effect. Works began in 1816, lasting till 1824 and marked the first time, since the French occupation, that prisoners were not used for works. The project was to take into account the important existing buildings: three churches, Santa Maria Del Popolo, Santa Maria di Montesanto (Saint Mary of Montesanto), Santa Maria dei Miracoli (Saint Mary of Miracles), the obelisk, Porta Del Popolo and Via del Corso, which were to remain untouched. The lateral structures were swept away redefining the square as an ellipse and were replaced by spacious exedras. These supported the fountains of Neptunebetween two tritons, and of the Goddess Roma on either side, added in 1823 during the reign of Pope Leo XII. The square became then accessible from side to side, as well as each end. With a touch of genius, the square was connected to the park on the hill above with a flight of curving steps and ramps, causing the Pincio hill to seem to cascade into the square below. Piazza del Popolo was the last papal contribution to Rome's legendary architecture, and in many ways reflects its splendor, inspiring a sense of awe in the visitor. Emphasizing this supremacy, the three churches dedicated to the Virgin, surrounded the obelisk which, in ancient times had been dedicated to the pagan Sun god. The twin churches at the far end of Piazza del Popolo, which Valadier had incorporated into his plans, had been constructed well over a century earlier. Though initiated by Carlo Rainaldi, they were completed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini with the collaboration of Carlo Fontana. Rainaldi invested the best of his abilities into the design and construction of Santa Maria dei Miracoli. His task was to both inspire and impress travelers entering the city, drawing them across the square to the beauty of the churches beyond. His skill as urban planner was evident. As well as being elevated from the level of the square, the two churches emphasized the elegant lines of the Trident, Via del Babbuino, Via del Corso and Via di Ripetta, radiating out beyond, adding depth and perspective to the overall picture. The observer's attention however, is drawn to the square on the splendid façades and apparent striking symmetry of Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto. He also used an element of illusion, as the churches, which appear so similar from a distance, are in fact charmingly individual. Constructing the churches' two façades was no mean feat, as their areas, differed in size, hindered the all important element of symmetry. The problem was overcome using differing dome dimensions. Santa Maria di Montesanto (having a smaller area) has an oval dome, whilst the larger Santa Maria dei Miracoli is circular. The impression from the square however, is of two identical domes. On July 15 1662, the first stone of Santa Maria di Montesanto was laid. After a brief interruption in 1673, construction was continued and completed under the guidance of Bernini and then Carlo Fontana. As both churches were designed with welcoming visitors in mind, their external qualities were prioritized. As well as being monumental scenery, the porticoes of the twin churches, touched with classicism, extended onto the square, breaking with the tradition of the Baroque style, heralding a new architectural age. Fusing the churches with the surrounding square, monuments and streets, creates an harmonious effect, in which one aspect of this body of space, cannot be separated from another. The Church of Santa Maria del Popolo (one of the three churches on the square), was built on the site where, according to tradition, the Emperor Nerowas buried. The church was constructed on request of and paid for by the Roman people (hence the name Saint Mary of the People). Legend tells how Nero's damned spirit was imprisoned in a walnut tree, which had grown above the spot where his body laid. The affrighted neighborhood requested that the tree be burnt down, and a church built there. Dedicated to the Virgin in 1099, it was perceived to have effectively exorcised the area of the ancient and untoward "presences" of demons, witches and uncanny nocturnal sightings of Nero's ghost. The clean simple lines of the Augustinian order in the church's façade was the work of Bernini. Inside are precious paintings by Pinturicchio, Annibale Carracci as well as Caravaggio's moving "Conversion of St Paul" and "Crucifixion of St Peter". Santa Maria del Popolo was the first church in Rome to have a dome with an octagonal tambour. Its brick bell tower in late-Gothic style, is unique too, with a clock, four small pinnacles and characteristic tiling. The Giacomo Acqua barracks, opposite Santa Maria del Popolo were added in the 1823; the small dome was designed to reflect the one of the ancient church, to maintain the square's symmetry. The bars and restaurants on the square are not as historic, as other places of the city, but they are an integral part of Piazza del Popolo, haunted throughout the years by figures dear to Rome, such as Trilussa, Guttuso and Pasolini.”
  • 183 personnes du coin recommandent
Lieu historique
“The Roman Forum was the pulsing heart of Rome, the city’s main piazza where citizens of every social level met to exchange opinions, do business, buy in the markets and renew their strength over a tasty dish and a cup of good wine. An enormous crowd gathered there every day. Walking through the Forum one might meet rich merchants in precious clothes and sandals; or barefoot serving girls carrying baskets full of produce; reclining Roman nobles on a litter carried by slaves or sellers yelling full voiced to attract the customers. There was an overwhelming mix of colors, smells and merchandise for sale, of thousands of different faces from all parts of the world as it was known then. Rome was a cosmopolitan city, filled with people from Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Along its streets one could go from one extreme to another; from the smiles of the Roman women to the prostitutes on the street corners, from the perfume of temple incense to the pungent smells of cooking food, from the gold of the monuments to the vagabonds lining the road. The Roman Forum is situated in the area between Piazza Venezia and the Colosseum is one of the most important archaeological sites in the world. Three thousand years ago, this valley between Campidoglio and the Quirinal, which was to become the future social and political centre of one of the greatest empires of ancient times, was submerged in marshland. By an incredible invention of engineering, which was commissioned by the last two Etruscan kings, the so-called Cloaca Maxima, a canal that is still in function to this very day, allowed for the drainage of the land. The area soon began to develop and already at the end of the 7th century BC, it was home to many markets and a hive of social activity. Foro was the name that the Romans gave to the central square of the urban settlement and we must try to imagine this busy, crowded place as the pulsing centre of a modern city. Here the masses would flock to see the meetings of the orators, attend criminal trials and discuss internal politics or the latest military campaigns, or quite simply to comment on the games or running races (an activity that the Romans particularly enjoyed). In the area around the Forum, the city was also home to markets, shops and taverns. You could also find the typical Termopolia, which were the ancient equivalent of today's fast food restaurants. In short, the Forum was the heart and soul of city life. It was in Caesar's time, when Rome has become the capital of a vast empire, that the Forum became a place for celebrations and in the Imperial era it was the symbol of the Empire. The most incredible panoramic view of the entire Forum complex can be seen from the magnificent terraces of Campidoglio. Here you can observe the imposing ruins of Basilica Emilia, the only remaining Republican basilica, or the Curia, which was once the seat of the Senate. Nearby you will also note three trees, a vine, fig and olive tree, cited by Pliny the Elder, which were replanted in recent times. Starting from the Arch of Septimius Severus, the pathway winds through the most unique place in the world and passes beside the imposing Basilica di Massenzio, one of the most magnificent buildings of Imperial Rome, and ends near the Arch of Titus, where you will get a glimpse of the unmistakable Colosseum. During the Middle Ages, the Forum fell into a state of ruin and was abandoned. Its monuments were often used to build medieval fortifications and at times were even completely dismantled and their materials used elsewhere. In those times, the area was used for cultivation and grazing and it took on the name of 'Campo Vaccino', or 'cattle field'. It was only in the eighteenth century that the Forum was rediscovered and finally the definitive process of the recovery of the ancient ruins began, bringing this long-forgotten and barbarically plundered historic patrimony back to life. ”
  • 108 personnes du coin recommandent
Église
“Una tra le più belle chiese di Roma. One of the most beautiful churches in Rome.”
  • 132 personnes du coin recommandent
Église
“Our Lady in Trastevere is a titular minor basilica in the Trastevere district of Rome, and one of the oldest churches of Rome”
  • 148 personnes du coin recommandent

Bibliothèques

Lieu historique
“Villa Medici is the Accademy of French Embassy but really excellent Building on the top of Piazza di Spagna with wonderfull garden.”
  • 20 personnes du coin recommandent
Librairie
“A bookshop with a focus on the female (and feminism), Tuba organizes many events dedicated to women, book launches and themed aperitivo evenings. Other than the books, the teas, beers and wines are all moderately priced and you can enjoy them either inside the cafe or at the tables outside. There’s also an impressive collection of sex toys on display which are available to buy.”
  • 19 personnes du coin recommandent
Library
“ Local is large and you may then connect to wi-fi, of course you can consult books, magazines and films. Cool atmosphere, relaxing and is comfortable, cosy lounges, great cocktails, happy hours.”
  • 16 personnes du coin recommandent
Librairie
“A small place filled with books and a selection of good wines and beer or snacks, often organic.”
  • 19 personnes du coin recommandent
Library
“La Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Roma (BNCR) è, insieme alla Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (BNCF) una delle due biblioteche nazionali italiane che hanno il compito principale di raccogliere e conservare tutte le pubblicazioni italiane. Si trova in viale Castro Pretorio, nei pressi della Stazione Termini, a Roma. La biblioteca è anche conosciuta col nome di "Vittorio Emanuele II", dal nome della personalità a cui è stata intitolata al momento della sua istituzione (1875). Il patrimonio della biblioteca comprende 8.355 manoscritti, 4.463.019 volumi a stampa (di cui 1.945 incunaboli e 25.296 cinquecentine), 1.357.681 opuscoli, 10.000 stampe e disegni, 20.000 carte geografiche”
  • 7 personnes du coin recommandent
Library
“A lot of beautiful shops where is possible to buy shoes, clothes and sport equipment (BUS 44 Morelli/Agnelli )”
  • 6 personnes du coin recommandent
Library
“Villa Mercede It' s a small park with a library inside. The park hosts a cat shelter too. It's the perfect place to relax!”
  • 9 personnes du coin recommandent
History Museum
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