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Visites touristiques et monuments à Zeeburg, Amsterdam-Oost

Musées d'art

Museum
“Amsterdam’s Tropenmuseum is a museum of world cultures, housed in one of the most beautiful museum buildings of the Netherlands, off the beaten tourist track in Amsterdam’s hip east.”
  • 293 personnes du coin recommandent
Museum
“Experience the tropics and the historical past of the dutch colonies. Especailly attractive for children.”
  • 1 personne du coin recommande

Musées d'histoire

History Museum
“The National Maritiem Museum is the anchor of Amsterdam and the place to discover more than 50 years of maritime history. ”
  • 272 personnes du coin recommandent
Museum
“Amsterdam’s Tropenmuseum is a museum of world cultures, housed in one of the most beautiful museum buildings of the Netherlands, off the beaten tourist track in Amsterdam’s hip east.”
  • 293 personnes du coin recommandent
Museum
“Learn about the Dutch resistance in World War II. You'll see, hear and read fascinating stories about the exceptional as well as the everyday. Both interactive and non-interactive exhibitions.”
  • 41 personnes du coin recommandent
Bateau ou traversier
“The Old West Indie trade, the first mega corporation in the world, establised in 1602”
  • 3 personnes du coin recommandent
Museum
“Experience the tropics and the historical past of the dutch colonies. Especailly attractive for children.”
  • 1 personne du coin recommande

Points de vue pittoresques

Monuments/Sites célèbres
“De Gooyer is a windmill in Amsterdam located between Funenkade and Zeeburgerstraat. It is the tallest wooden mill in the Netherlands at 26.6 meters high. It is registered as a National Monument. The names dates from the around 1609, when the mill was owned by Claes and Jan Willemsz, two brothers from Gooiland. It is also known as "The Funenmolen" ("The Mill on the Funen"). The Gooyer consists of a stone foundation topped by a wooden octagonal body. The mill is owned by the municipality of Amsterdam and is not open to visitors. Although the blades are functional, they no longer operate any grinding mechanism. Next to the mill, in the former municipal bathhouse dating back to 1911, is the Brouwerij 't IJ. The mill and the bathhouse building are unrelated, and the mill fulfils no function for the brewery despite the image of a mill being in the brewery logo. History The original mill was constructed in the 16th century. After destruction and some movements, in 1725 the mill stood on the site of the current Orange-Nassau barracks.Finally, in 1814 the mill moved again to its current location on Funenkade atop the stone base of a watermill that had been demolished in 1812. This mill is the last of 26 corn mills on the bastions of the 17th century walls of Amsterdam. The location of the mills was at that time very favourable as the outskirts of town provided ample wind. After the mill had fallen into disrepair, it was purchased in 1928 by the city of Amsterdam for 3200 guilders and restored. Due to the lack of power during the Second World War the mill served as a corn mill for Amsterdam. The sails were damaged on November 13, 1972 during a storm. The upper shaft broke and the blades embedded in the adjacent Nieuwevaart. Some years later the original, old Dutch type blades were restored. ”
  • 32 personnes du coin recommandent

Sites historiques

Monuments/Sites célèbres
“De Gooyer is a windmill in Amsterdam located between Funenkade and Zeeburgerstraat. It is the tallest wooden mill in the Netherlands at 26.6 meters high. It is registered as a National Monument. The names dates from the around 1609, when the mill was owned by Claes and Jan Willemsz, two brothers from Gooiland. It is also known as "The Funenmolen" ("The Mill on the Funen"). The Gooyer consists of a stone foundation topped by a wooden octagonal body. The mill is owned by the municipality of Amsterdam and is not open to visitors. Although the blades are functional, they no longer operate any grinding mechanism. Next to the mill, in the former municipal bathhouse dating back to 1911, is the Brouwerij 't IJ. The mill and the bathhouse building are unrelated, and the mill fulfils no function for the brewery despite the image of a mill being in the brewery logo. History The original mill was constructed in the 16th century. After destruction and some movements, in 1725 the mill stood on the site of the current Orange-Nassau barracks.Finally, in 1814 the mill moved again to its current location on Funenkade atop the stone base of a watermill that had been demolished in 1812. This mill is the last of 26 corn mills on the bastions of the 17th century walls of Amsterdam. The location of the mills was at that time very favourable as the outskirts of town provided ample wind. After the mill had fallen into disrepair, it was purchased in 1928 by the city of Amsterdam for 3200 guilders and restored. Due to the lack of power during the Second World War the mill served as a corn mill for Amsterdam. The sails were damaged on November 13, 1972 during a storm. The upper shaft broke and the blades embedded in the adjacent Nieuwevaart. Some years later the original, old Dutch type blades were restored. ”
  • 32 personnes du coin recommandent

Bibliothèques

Library
  • 1 personne du coin recommande
Library
“Greet finds and special place. Great book section English, if you are lucky :) Thriftstore ”
  • 1 personne du coin recommande
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