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Things to see and do around us while staying at Middleton by Wirksworth

Helen

Things to see and do around us while staying at Middleton by Wirksworth

Local recommended places to eat
Lovely French bistro restaurant which we have eaten at many times. Good value quality food just 5 minutes drive away Wirksworth’s very own award-winning French-inspired bistro and wine shop. Whether you’re wanting a romantic dinner, a work or family celebration, a glass of wine and a snack, or simply a coffee and pastry, we always deliver simple, delicious food that’s locally-sourced and cooked fresh to order. Alongside there delicious and authentically-French A La Carte Menu, daytime Lunch/Snack Menu and regularly-changing Blackboard Specials, they offer a variety of tempting offers (inc. Wine & Dine for £13.95 between Sunday and Wednesday) https://www.lemistral.co.uk/wirksworth/
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Le Mistral Wirksworth - French Restaurant
23 Market Place
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habitants recommandent
Lovely French bistro restaurant which we have eaten at many times. Good value quality food just 5 minutes drive away Wirksworth’s very own award-winning French-inspired bistro and wine shop. Whether you’re wanting a romantic dinner, a work or family celebration, a glass of wine and a snack, or simply a coffee and pastry, we always deliver simple, delicious food that’s locally-sourced and cooked fresh to order. Alongside there delicious and authentically-French A La Carte Menu, daytime Lunch/Snack Menu and regularly-changing Blackboard Specials, they offer a variety of tempting offers (inc. Wine & Dine for £13.95 between Sunday and Wednesday) https://www.lemistral.co.uk/wirksworth/
Established in 2005 in the town of Matlock, it shares the space with former Ritz cinema, and still retains its archaic spirit. In a histrionic ambience that carves the cultural heritage of its origin, entrepreneur Irfan Shabir brings his home to you. Aromatic curries served in clay-pots, hand-crafted menus and traditional incense of agarbatti lures your senses into the rich culinary art of India in every bite. Also does free delivery to the apartment https://maazi.co.uk/locations/matlock/
Maazi Matlock
25 Causeway Ln
Established in 2005 in the town of Matlock, it shares the space with former Ritz cinema, and still retains its archaic spirit. In a histrionic ambience that carves the cultural heritage of its origin, entrepreneur Irfan Shabir brings his home to you. Aromatic curries served in clay-pots, hand-crafted menus and traditional incense of agarbatti lures your senses into the rich culinary art of India in every bite. Also does free delivery to the apartment https://maazi.co.uk/locations/matlock/
A family run coffee lounge & Tea room located in the beautiful Amber Valley on the banks of the picturesque River Derwent just outside the peak District. We are pleased to offer breakfasts, lunches, Afternoon tea, delicious home-made cakes and refreshing beverages. https://www.thefamilytreederbyshire.co.uk/
The Family Tree
A family run coffee lounge & Tea room located in the beautiful Amber Valley on the banks of the picturesque River Derwent just outside the peak District. We are pleased to offer breakfasts, lunches, Afternoon tea, delicious home-made cakes and refreshing beverages. https://www.thefamilytreederbyshire.co.uk/
Top rated indian cuisine. The Shalimar Restaurant is a traditional and charming Indian restaurant which is perfect for the family, romantic evenings and relaxed business functions. We offer spacious dining in a setting that is accompanied by chandeliers, plush carpets, comfy seats, and brass statues. Our vibrant, welcoming atmosphere will make your dining experience a memorable one. The Shalimar has an authentic Indian menu featuring all of your favourite curries plus some unique house specialties. The bar serves Cobra Larger and locally brewed real ale along with a fantastic collection of international wines to accompany your meal. http://www.theshalimar.co.uk/
The Shalimar
Top rated indian cuisine. The Shalimar Restaurant is a traditional and charming Indian restaurant which is perfect for the family, romantic evenings and relaxed business functions. We offer spacious dining in a setting that is accompanied by chandeliers, plush carpets, comfy seats, and brass statues. Our vibrant, welcoming atmosphere will make your dining experience a memorable one. The Shalimar has an authentic Indian menu featuring all of your favourite curries plus some unique house specialties. The bar serves Cobra Larger and locally brewed real ale along with a fantastic collection of international wines to accompany your meal. http://www.theshalimar.co.uk/
Mercia is a relaxed, cosy independently run bistro restaurant serving brunch, lunch, dinner and drinks. Serving only the best locally produced, home made fresh to order food our menus change seasonally. Booking not always essential, walk-ins welcome. https://www.facebook.com/merciawirksworth/
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Mercia
5 Market Pl
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Mercia is a relaxed, cosy independently run bistro restaurant serving brunch, lunch, dinner and drinks. Serving only the best locally produced, home made fresh to order food our menus change seasonally. Booking not always essential, walk-ins welcome. https://www.facebook.com/merciawirksworth/
At PARKYS eatery you can enjoy breakfast, lunch, cream teas and a bistro evening meal whilst relaxing in a warm friendly ambience with a glass or two. PARKYS eatery sits at the bottom of Cromford Hill. Formed by Rob and Steve in June 2016 we offer a comfortable space to enjoy Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. If you are looking for a romantic meal, a celebration, a glass of wine and nibble or a fab coffee and cake we are a great choice. All of our food is sourced locally and cooked to order in-house. We serve real Italian coffee and a great selection of teas https://www.facebook.com/ParkysEateryCromford 11-13 Market Place DE4 3RE Cromford Telephone 01629 823333
Parkys
11-13 Market Pl
At PARKYS eatery you can enjoy breakfast, lunch, cream teas and a bistro evening meal whilst relaxing in a warm friendly ambience with a glass or two. PARKYS eatery sits at the bottom of Cromford Hill. Formed by Rob and Steve in June 2016 we offer a comfortable space to enjoy Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. If you are looking for a romantic meal, a celebration, a glass of wine and nibble or a fab coffee and cake we are a great choice. All of our food is sourced locally and cooked to order in-house. We serve real Italian coffee and a great selection of teas https://www.facebook.com/ParkysEateryCromford 11-13 Market Place DE4 3RE Cromford Telephone 01629 823333
Authentic Spanish tapas served in a relaxing atmosphere. This family run business is located behind The Market Place Restaurant https://www.marketplacerestaurant.co.uk/
The Market Place Restaurant & Tapas Bar
Authentic Spanish tapas served in a relaxing atmosphere. This family run business is located behind The Market Place Restaurant https://www.marketplacerestaurant.co.uk/
Nestled at the beginning of the main tourist thoroughfare in Matlock Bath is the popular fish and chip restaurant and takeaway that goes by the name of Tucker’s. Established in 1982 in Bolton and then opening in Matlock Bath early 1994, Tucker’s has always been proud of the excellence of the food and the quality of service. Described by discerning visitors as an “absolute must-visit”, Tucker’s has been carefully and affectionately nurtured over the years by owners Barry and Val Tucker. Complimentary comments are commonplace; glancing through independent websites about Matlock Bath appear references about Tucker’s like the following: “If chip-shops were given stars, Tucker’s would have deserved five.", “The fish and chips at Tucker's are out of this world - must be tasted to be believed!”, “The fragrant chips are delightfully browned, yet soft and fluffy on the inside, the fish succulent, tasty and encased in a unique batter reminiscent of the stuff your Granny used to make.” and “Portions are generous, with child sizes available, and the shop is always spotlessly clean, even on the busiest dinner-hour. Nothing is too much trouble for the staff, who are always pleasant, friendly and with a ready smile.” With such glowing referrals, it might be easy for a business to rest on its laurels. With Tucker’s, however, there’s not a chance of it. A recent investment of in excess of £50,000 has seen the arrival of a bespoke, high efficiency frying range. The new British-made fish and chip frying range from ME-FF, has solved the eternal problem of retaining quality of product and service whilst keeping costs down. Beautifully constructed out of stainless steel, the new range boasts high efficiency of around 95% and offers around 30% savings on energy bills. Also, because of the reduced emissions of fumes and carbon gases due to a more efficient combustion process, Tucker’s has been seen to be taking a responsible attitude to environmental protection. Barry is keen to point out, “Matlock Bath has incredibly busy times when we need a frying system which is very quick and efficient to deal with the queues of hungry customers. We need four pans in action at the same time, they need to come up to temperature fast and the recovery time between batches of food has to be as short as possible. With this new system of open frying, we achieve all of this. We should be able to increase output by a third, reduce energy bills by a third and also improve the quality of the food at the same time!” The new frying model has a completely new burner system which is computer controlled for maximum gas efficiency. It also has an inbuilt oil filtering system, which along with the many safety advantages also enables Tucker’s (on request) to provide customers gluten and wheat free battered fish and chips. For fish and chips which are “out of this world”, be sure to call at Tucker’s, 18 North Parade, Matlock Bath. Telephone 01629 57306 for further details.
Tucker's Fish & Chips
18 N Parade
Nestled at the beginning of the main tourist thoroughfare in Matlock Bath is the popular fish and chip restaurant and takeaway that goes by the name of Tucker’s. Established in 1982 in Bolton and then opening in Matlock Bath early 1994, Tucker’s has always been proud of the excellence of the food and the quality of service. Described by discerning visitors as an “absolute must-visit”, Tucker’s has been carefully and affectionately nurtured over the years by owners Barry and Val Tucker. Complimentary comments are commonplace; glancing through independent websites about Matlock Bath appear references about Tucker’s like the following: “If chip-shops were given stars, Tucker’s would have deserved five.", “The fish and chips at Tucker's are out of this world - must be tasted to be believed!”, “The fragrant chips are delightfully browned, yet soft and fluffy on the inside, the fish succulent, tasty and encased in a unique batter reminiscent of the stuff your Granny used to make.” and “Portions are generous, with child sizes available, and the shop is always spotlessly clean, even on the busiest dinner-hour. Nothing is too much trouble for the staff, who are always pleasant, friendly and with a ready smile.” With such glowing referrals, it might be easy for a business to rest on its laurels. With Tucker’s, however, there’s not a chance of it. A recent investment of in excess of £50,000 has seen the arrival of a bespoke, high efficiency frying range. The new British-made fish and chip frying range from ME-FF, has solved the eternal problem of retaining quality of product and service whilst keeping costs down. Beautifully constructed out of stainless steel, the new range boasts high efficiency of around 95% and offers around 30% savings on energy bills. Also, because of the reduced emissions of fumes and carbon gases due to a more efficient combustion process, Tucker’s has been seen to be taking a responsible attitude to environmental protection. Barry is keen to point out, “Matlock Bath has incredibly busy times when we need a frying system which is very quick and efficient to deal with the queues of hungry customers. We need four pans in action at the same time, they need to come up to temperature fast and the recovery time between batches of food has to be as short as possible. With this new system of open frying, we achieve all of this. We should be able to increase output by a third, reduce energy bills by a third and also improve the quality of the food at the same time!” The new frying model has a completely new burner system which is computer controlled for maximum gas efficiency. It also has an inbuilt oil filtering system, which along with the many safety advantages also enables Tucker’s (on request) to provide customers gluten and wheat free battered fish and chips. For fish and chips which are “out of this world”, be sure to call at Tucker’s, 18 North Parade, Matlock Bath. Telephone 01629 57306 for further details.
Traditional Fish and Chip shop located in Wirksworth offer a good selection of different fish and chip meals, burgers, kebabs and also offer gluten free options if you ring in advance. 19 Market Place, Matlock DE4 4ET England Tel 01629 822724
Wirksworth Fish Bar
19 Market Place
Traditional Fish and Chip shop located in Wirksworth offer a good selection of different fish and chip meals, burgers, kebabs and also offer gluten free options if you ring in advance. 19 Market Place, Matlock DE4 4ET England Tel 01629 822724
The National Stone Centre has an amazing café on site; Blue Lagoon. The friendly staff at Blue Lagoon will prepare fresh hot and cold food all with locally sourced ingredients, you can enjoy specialty teas as well as the best coffee in the area (in our humble opinion). Why not try our all day breakfast! When walking the High Peak Trail, why not treat yourself, call in and try a delicious freshly baked home-made fruit or cheese scone (especially the cheese!) and a proper English pot of tea. Opening times: Mon - Sat: 9am - 5pm Sun: 10am - 4pm Come along - we look forward to seeing you... New - Main and Takeaway menus
Blue Lagoon
The National Stone Centre has an amazing café on site; Blue Lagoon. The friendly staff at Blue Lagoon will prepare fresh hot and cold food all with locally sourced ingredients, you can enjoy specialty teas as well as the best coffee in the area (in our humble opinion). Why not try our all day breakfast! When walking the High Peak Trail, why not treat yourself, call in and try a delicious freshly baked home-made fruit or cheese scone (especially the cheese!) and a proper English pot of tea. Opening times: Mon - Sat: 9am - 5pm Sun: 10am - 4pm Come along - we look forward to seeing you... New - Main and Takeaway menus
The local premier restaurant in our opinion Tucked away in the heart of Matlock, Stones is a cosy and eclectic restaurant. Above all, we hope to provide a stylish, welcoming decor and a superb modern British menu. Stones is run by Head Chef Kevin Stone, wife Jade and sister Katie Temple. Our aim is to provide a fantastic dining experience in a relaxed setting. The dining room is popular with couples, locals and visitors alike, offering a perfect place for romantic, family or business meals. We also have a beautiful riverside terrace, where you can relax, dine and unwind with a glass of wine from our extensive wine list. We offer a set menu at lunch and dinner alongside a Tasting Menu. We also offer a bespoke vegetarian offering. Our menus change regularly to reflect the very best in seasonal and local produce. You can join us at Stones for lunch 12-1.30 Wednesday to Saturday and for dinner 6.30-8.30 Tuesday to Saturday. Fridays and Saturdays are particularly busy, we would advise booking ahead if possible. Stones Restaurant, 1c Dale Road, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 3LT t 01629 56061 e info@stones-restaurant.co.uk http://www.stones-restaurant.co.uk/#reviews
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Stones
1 Dale Rd
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The local premier restaurant in our opinion Tucked away in the heart of Matlock, Stones is a cosy and eclectic restaurant. Above all, we hope to provide a stylish, welcoming decor and a superb modern British menu. Stones is run by Head Chef Kevin Stone, wife Jade and sister Katie Temple. Our aim is to provide a fantastic dining experience in a relaxed setting. The dining room is popular with couples, locals and visitors alike, offering a perfect place for romantic, family or business meals. We also have a beautiful riverside terrace, where you can relax, dine and unwind with a glass of wine from our extensive wine list. We offer a set menu at lunch and dinner alongside a Tasting Menu. We also offer a bespoke vegetarian offering. Our menus change regularly to reflect the very best in seasonal and local produce. You can join us at Stones for lunch 12-1.30 Wednesday to Saturday and for dinner 6.30-8.30 Tuesday to Saturday. Fridays and Saturdays are particularly busy, we would advise booking ahead if possible. Stones Restaurant, 1c Dale Road, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 3LT t 01629 56061 e info@stones-restaurant.co.uk http://www.stones-restaurant.co.uk/#reviews
Shopping
You can get everything you need from the Supermarkets including Sainsburys, Marks & Spencer, Iceland, Co-op. There are lots of coffee bars, restaurants, antique shops along with some banks in Matlock also.
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Matlock
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You can get everything you need from the Supermarkets including Sainsburys, Marks & Spencer, Iceland, Co-op. There are lots of coffee bars, restaurants, antique shops along with some banks in Matlock also.
A unique day out for all the family. At Masson Mills we cater for a great variety of ages and have the facilities to keep everyone entertained. We have shops to browse, all the latest fashions from brands like The Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Roman Originals and Peacocks, to local food produce and Whiskies from around the world. Our play area 'Tree Top Tumble' is popular with the little ones, whilst those more interested in the history of the building may choose to have a tour of our Working Textile Museum. During your visit you can refresh and relax in our Derwent Restaurant. Sip on a cup of Puro coffee, fill up on one of hot plate specials or indulge in a cream cake.
Masson Mills Shopping Village & Historic Mills
A unique day out for all the family. At Masson Mills we cater for a great variety of ages and have the facilities to keep everyone entertained. We have shops to browse, all the latest fashions from brands like The Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Roman Originals and Peacocks, to local food produce and Whiskies from around the world. Our play area 'Tree Top Tumble' is popular with the little ones, whilst those more interested in the history of the building may choose to have a tour of our Working Textile Museum. During your visit you can refresh and relax in our Derwent Restaurant. Sip on a cup of Puro coffee, fill up on one of hot plate specials or indulge in a cream cake.
Great value and choice in fashion, outdoor gear, homeware and gifts. Peak Shopping Village is a perfect day out if you are looking for a unique shopping experience in the stunning countryside of Derbyshire and the Peak District National Park.
Peak Shopping Village
Great value and choice in fashion, outdoor gear, homeware and gifts. Peak Shopping Village is a perfect day out if you are looking for a unique shopping experience in the stunning countryside of Derbyshire and the Peak District National Park.
rom the GUARDIAN ONLINE’s list of the ‘World’s 10 Best Bookshops‘, with Scarthin Books at number six…. and one of your Favourite Independent Bookshops 6) Scarthin’s in the Peak District – “Of course, others might prefer the altogether more earthy beauty of a shop like Scarthin Books in the Peak District. Scarthin’s has been selling new and second-hand books since the mid-1970s. It has rooms full of new and old books, a delightful café and what can best be described as a small exhibition of curiosities on the first floor. It is a bookshop so beloved, that it advertises local guest and farmhouses on its websites where devotees can stay overnight”. (© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited). Café Philosophique Around the year 1993 it became fashionable in Paris to hold semi-formal philosophical discussions in cafés and so the term Cafe Philosophique was born. At this time, Evan Rutherford, the Mad Potter of Wirksworth or Professor of Green Hill was giving a series of basic philosophy lessons to Scarthin Books’ Mitchell family and friends in their home. When we opened the Scarthin Books Café, we decided to follow the Parisian lead and to go public in the Café. Thus was born our own Scarthin Books Café Philosophique. There’s a nominal charge to cover food and some advertising costs. The meetings are advertised by means of posters and the website in addition to a mailing list. We have never sought outside professional or paid speakers; it has been abundantly proved that many members of our own shifting group have at least one lecture to a very high standard inside them – perhaps based on revived university studies, on a dissertation or, more often, on an intense personal interest. Other speakers have been found through personal networks and recommendations. Over the years attendance has waxed and waned – from as few as six to as many as thirty six at Scarthin evenings; twelve to twenty is more normal and more comfortable. Scarthin Books The Promenade Cromford Matlock Derbyshire DE4 3QF 01629 823272 nickscarthin@gmail.com
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Scarthin Books
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rom the GUARDIAN ONLINE’s list of the ‘World’s 10 Best Bookshops‘, with Scarthin Books at number six…. and one of your Favourite Independent Bookshops 6) Scarthin’s in the Peak District – “Of course, others might prefer the altogether more earthy beauty of a shop like Scarthin Books in the Peak District. Scarthin’s has been selling new and second-hand books since the mid-1970s. It has rooms full of new and old books, a delightful café and what can best be described as a small exhibition of curiosities on the first floor. It is a bookshop so beloved, that it advertises local guest and farmhouses on its websites where devotees can stay overnight”. (© 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited). Café Philosophique Around the year 1993 it became fashionable in Paris to hold semi-formal philosophical discussions in cafés and so the term Cafe Philosophique was born. At this time, Evan Rutherford, the Mad Potter of Wirksworth or Professor of Green Hill was giving a series of basic philosophy lessons to Scarthin Books’ Mitchell family and friends in their home. When we opened the Scarthin Books Café, we decided to follow the Parisian lead and to go public in the Café. Thus was born our own Scarthin Books Café Philosophique. There’s a nominal charge to cover food and some advertising costs. The meetings are advertised by means of posters and the website in addition to a mailing list. We have never sought outside professional or paid speakers; it has been abundantly proved that many members of our own shifting group have at least one lecture to a very high standard inside them – perhaps based on revived university studies, on a dissertation or, more often, on an intense personal interest. Other speakers have been found through personal networks and recommendations. Over the years attendance has waxed and waned – from as few as six to as many as thirty six at Scarthin evenings; twelve to twenty is more normal and more comfortable. Scarthin Books The Promenade Cromford Matlock Derbyshire DE4 3QF 01629 823272 nickscarthin@gmail.com
Local food shopping
A petrol station with a very large convenience store where you can get everything you would require for a weekly shop. Harrison Dr, Wirksworth, Matlock DE4 4FG Tel 01629 824879 Store Hours Day of the Week Hours Wednesday 06:00 - 22:00 Thursday 06:00 - 22:00 Friday 06:00 - 22:00 Saturday 06:00 - 22:00 Sunday 06:00 - 22:00 Monday 06:00 - 22:00 Tuesday 06:00 - 22:00
Co-op Food & Grocery Store, Wirksworth, Derby
A petrol station with a very large convenience store where you can get everything you would require for a weekly shop. Harrison Dr, Wirksworth, Matlock DE4 4FG Tel 01629 824879 Store Hours Day of the Week Hours Wednesday 06:00 - 22:00 Thursday 06:00 - 22:00 Friday 06:00 - 22:00 Saturday 06:00 - 22:00 Sunday 06:00 - 22:00 Monday 06:00 - 22:00 Tuesday 06:00 - 22:00
Our largest local supermarket Sainsbury's Cawdor Way Matlock DE4 3SP Phone: 01629 583521 Web: www.sainsburys.co.uk Opening Times: Mon 8am - 10pm Tue 8am - 10pm Wed 8am - 10pm Thu 8am - 10pm Fri 8am - 10pm Sat 8am - 10pm Sun 10am - 4pm
Sainsbury's
Our largest local supermarket Sainsbury's Cawdor Way Matlock DE4 3SP Phone: 01629 583521 Web: www.sainsburys.co.uk Opening Times: Mon 8am - 10pm Tue 8am - 10pm Wed 8am - 10pm Thu 8am - 10pm Fri 8am - 10pm Sat 8am - 10pm Sun 10am - 4pm
Ken’s is Wirksworth’s own unique Supermarket. We are small enough to be friendly (and know most of our customers by name), but large enough to be able to offer a great deal on many items, often able to compete with the major supermarkets’ prices (and you don’t have to drive there!). Known for there friendly service, exciting selection of foodstuffs, fresh fruit and veg , the Posh Wine and the Very Posh Wine, and their brilliant Bargain Trolley, Ken’s epitomises the spirit of Wirksworth. Unique, quirky and a local mainstay. 1-5 St John's St, Wirksworth, Matlock DE4 4DR Tel 01629 825564
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Kens Supermarket
1-5 St John's St
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Ken’s is Wirksworth’s own unique Supermarket. We are small enough to be friendly (and know most of our customers by name), but large enough to be able to offer a great deal on many items, often able to compete with the major supermarkets’ prices (and you don’t have to drive there!). Known for there friendly service, exciting selection of foodstuffs, fresh fruit and veg , the Posh Wine and the Very Posh Wine, and their brilliant Bargain Trolley, Ken’s epitomises the spirit of Wirksworth. Unique, quirky and a local mainstay. 1-5 St John's St, Wirksworth, Matlock DE4 4DR Tel 01629 825564
CROWN SQUARE BAKEWELL ROAD, MATLOCK, United Kingdom, DE4 3AU Phone: 01629629267 Departments Bakery Cards & wrap Flowers & plants Food Food on the move Food order collection desk Wine Wednesday 08:00-20:00 Thursday 08:00-20:00 Friday 08:00-20:00 Saturday 08:00-20:00 Sunday 11:00-17:00 Monday 20th Jul08:00-20:00 Tuesday 21st Jul08:00-20:00
Marks & Spencer MATLOCK FOODHALL
CROWN SQUARE BAKEWELL ROAD, MATLOCK, United Kingdom, DE4 3AU Phone: 01629629267 Departments Bakery Cards & wrap Flowers & plants Food Food on the move Food order collection desk Wine Wednesday 08:00-20:00 Thursday 08:00-20:00 Friday 08:00-20:00 Saturday 08:00-20:00 Sunday 11:00-17:00 Monday 20th Jul08:00-20:00 Tuesday 21st Jul08:00-20:00
Drinks & Nightlife
Local music acts and comedians etc play at the venue in Matlock Bath just about 5 minute drive away http://www.thefishpondmatlockbath.co.uk/live/event-calendar/
The Fishpond Freehouse Matlock Bath
204 S Parade
Local music acts and comedians etc play at the venue in Matlock Bath just about 5 minute drive away http://www.thefishpondmatlockbath.co.uk/live/event-calendar/
The Loft is Matlock's latest and newest Bar and Entertainments Venue. Home of Manfords Comedy club and many monthly music events.
The Loft
34 Bakewell Road, Crown Square
The Loft is Matlock's latest and newest Bar and Entertainments Venue. Home of Manfords Comedy club and many monthly music events.
This pub takes its name from the malt whisky which made Wishaw famous. Around this time, cotton-weaving was established in Wishaw. Domestic hand loom weaving and finishing became the main livelihood for many families and remained so well into the 19th century.
The Crown
This pub takes its name from the malt whisky which made Wishaw famous. Around this time, cotton-weaving was established in Wishaw. Domestic hand loom weaving and finishing became the main livelihood for many families and remained so well into the 19th century.
The Nelson Arms pub is a free house located at the top end of Middleton by Wirksworth that offers a variety of quality real ales in a comfortable, friendly atmosphere. We sell beers from a range of regularly changing micro breweries from across the UK. We have regular live music, folk jam sessions, a relaxed trivia quiz, boules tournaments and many other entertainment events.
The Nelson Arms
The Nelson Arms pub is a free house located at the top end of Middleton by Wirksworth that offers a variety of quality real ales in a comfortable, friendly atmosphere. We sell beers from a range of regularly changing micro breweries from across the UK. We have regular live music, folk jam sessions, a relaxed trivia quiz, boules tournaments and many other entertainment events.
traditional country pub located in the lovely village of Middleton by Wirksworth. Adjacent to the High Peak Trail, we offer a wide selection of Real Ale, lagers, wines, and other drinks. For the hungry, we cook a variety of "Home cooked and hearty" meals, as well as bar food, perfect for a meal out or a quick snack. weekly quizzes, live music and other events. Rise End, Middleton, Matlock DE4 4LS, UK risingsunmiddleton@yahoo.com Tel 01629 258658
The Rising Sun Middleton
traditional country pub located in the lovely village of Middleton by Wirksworth. Adjacent to the High Peak Trail, we offer a wide selection of Real Ale, lagers, wines, and other drinks. For the hungry, we cook a variety of "Home cooked and hearty" meals, as well as bar food, perfect for a meal out or a quick snack. weekly quizzes, live music and other events. Rise End, Middleton, Matlock DE4 4LS, UK risingsunmiddleton@yahoo.com Tel 01629 258658
Films are great aren’t they? Everyone loves a good movie, whatever a ‘good movie’ means to them. The Northern Light Cinema aims to put the fun back in film, making a trip to the flicks not just about watching great movies but about having a great night out. To compliment our range of films, our bar serves a great range of beers, wines and spirits. All served to help wash down the range of Mediterranean-inspired food, perfectly sourced and presented. All this, tucked away in the old Malthouse on North End, here in Wirksworth, the hidden gem of the Peak District. The Northern Light Cinema – doing films differently. https://www.thenorthernlightcinema.co.uk/
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The Northern Light Cinema
13 North End
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Films are great aren’t they? Everyone loves a good movie, whatever a ‘good movie’ means to them. The Northern Light Cinema aims to put the fun back in film, making a trip to the flicks not just about watching great movies but about having a great night out. To compliment our range of films, our bar serves a great range of beers, wines and spirits. All served to help wash down the range of Mediterranean-inspired food, perfectly sourced and presented. All this, tucked away in the old Malthouse on North End, here in Wirksworth, the hidden gem of the Peak District. The Northern Light Cinema – doing films differently. https://www.thenorthernlightcinema.co.uk/
Parks & Nature
An outcrop of gritstone sculpted by the wind and rain, Black Rocks hang high above the village of Cromford with Cromford Moor behind and the High Peak Trail (the former Cromford and High Peak Railway) passing just below. It's a spectacular situation which affords a splendid view of the Derwent valley around Matlock and because of its popularity the area has been designated a country park. This is a popular place for recreation, with rock-climbing available on the rocks themselves and plenty of scope for walking in the park, which stretches right down to High Peak Junction where the former railway met the Cromford canal. There is also a fixed orienteering course and forest trails in the surr
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Black Rocks
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An outcrop of gritstone sculpted by the wind and rain, Black Rocks hang high above the village of Cromford with Cromford Moor behind and the High Peak Trail (the former Cromford and High Peak Railway) passing just below. It's a spectacular situation which affords a splendid view of the Derwent valley around Matlock and because of its popularity the area has been designated a country park. This is a popular place for recreation, with rock-climbing available on the rocks themselves and plenty of scope for walking in the park, which stretches right down to High Peak Junction where the former railway met the Cromford canal. There is also a fixed orienteering course and forest trails in the surr
This superb District Council park in the heart of Matlock celebrated its centenary year in 2011. In 2017 Hall Leys Park gained its 10th consecutive Green Flag award from the Keep Britain Tidy Group, making it officially one of the best parks in the whole of the UK. green flag awardThe updated children's play area is just one of many attractions in the Hall Leys, which was further enhanced in 2011 by a brand new toilet block and, in 2012, by new accessible play equipment suitable for disabled youngsters and their friends and family. In July 2017 a new multi-use games area (MUGA) was added in the same part of the park as the tennis courts and skateboard park.
Hall Leys Park
This superb District Council park in the heart of Matlock celebrated its centenary year in 2011. In 2017 Hall Leys Park gained its 10th consecutive Green Flag award from the Keep Britain Tidy Group, making it officially one of the best parks in the whole of the UK. green flag awardThe updated children's play area is just one of many attractions in the Hall Leys, which was further enhanced in 2011 by a brand new toilet block and, in 2012, by new accessible play equipment suitable for disabled youngsters and their friends and family. In July 2017 a new multi-use games area (MUGA) was added in the same part of the park as the tennis courts and skateboard park.
The High Peak Railway line first opened in 1831 and was mainly designed to carry minerals and goods between Cromford Canal and the Peak Forest Canal. Following the closure of the line, the Peak District National Park bought the route in 1971 and turned it into a traffic free trail for walkers and cyclists. The High Peak Trail is a 17-mile (27 km) trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders in the Peak District of England. Running from Dowlow (53.2059°N 1.8349°W), near Buxton, to High Peak Junction, Cromford (53.1004°N 1.5354°W), it follows the trackbed of the former Cromford and High Peak Railway, which was completed in 1831 to carry minerals and goods between the Cromford Canal wharf at High Peak Junction and the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge. Closure of the line occurred during the Beeching era, with the first section of the line closing in 1963 (i.e. the Middleton Incline) followed by full closure in 1967. In 1971 the Peak Park Planning Board and Derbyshire County Council bought the largest part of the trackbed and, in partnership with the Countryside Commission, adapted it for its current leisure use. The trail has a crushed limestone surface which makes it ideal for all users, including wheelchair use, assisted by level access onto the trail at various points along its route. The High Peak Trail is now a national route of the National Cycle Network. The elevated nature of the trail (the highest part of the line is at Ladmanlow, at a height of 1,266 ft or 386 m) affords many splendid views across the countryside. However, these higher sections can also be very exposed in poor weather. The original railway incorporated a number of inclines at its northern and southern ends, and whilst much of the trail is fairly level, these sections are naturally steeper. At Parsley Hay, about 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Bakewell, the High Peak Trail is joined by the 13-mile (21 km) Tissington Trail, another route of the National Cycle Network, which was formerly the railway branch line to Ashbourne. The High Peak Trail (and part of the Tissington Trail) are also designated part of the Pennine Bridleway, a 130-mile (210 km) leisure route which starts at Middleton Top, near Cromford, and includes 73 miles (117 km) through Derbyshire to the South Pennines. The Trail also forms part of the Midshires Way, a long-distance footpath and bridleway which runs for 225 miles (362 km) through the Midlands from Bledlow to Stockport.
High Peak Trail
The High Peak Railway line first opened in 1831 and was mainly designed to carry minerals and goods between Cromford Canal and the Peak Forest Canal. Following the closure of the line, the Peak District National Park bought the route in 1971 and turned it into a traffic free trail for walkers and cyclists. The High Peak Trail is a 17-mile (27 km) trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders in the Peak District of England. Running from Dowlow (53.2059°N 1.8349°W), near Buxton, to High Peak Junction, Cromford (53.1004°N 1.5354°W), it follows the trackbed of the former Cromford and High Peak Railway, which was completed in 1831 to carry minerals and goods between the Cromford Canal wharf at High Peak Junction and the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge. Closure of the line occurred during the Beeching era, with the first section of the line closing in 1963 (i.e. the Middleton Incline) followed by full closure in 1967. In 1971 the Peak Park Planning Board and Derbyshire County Council bought the largest part of the trackbed and, in partnership with the Countryside Commission, adapted it for its current leisure use. The trail has a crushed limestone surface which makes it ideal for all users, including wheelchair use, assisted by level access onto the trail at various points along its route. The High Peak Trail is now a national route of the National Cycle Network. The elevated nature of the trail (the highest part of the line is at Ladmanlow, at a height of 1,266 ft or 386 m) affords many splendid views across the countryside. However, these higher sections can also be very exposed in poor weather. The original railway incorporated a number of inclines at its northern and southern ends, and whilst much of the trail is fairly level, these sections are naturally steeper. At Parsley Hay, about 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Bakewell, the High Peak Trail is joined by the 13-mile (21 km) Tissington Trail, another route of the National Cycle Network, which was formerly the railway branch line to Ashbourne. The High Peak Trail (and part of the Tissington Trail) are also designated part of the Pennine Bridleway, a 130-mile (210 km) leisure route which starts at Middleton Top, near Cromford, and includes 73 miles (117 km) through Derbyshire to the South Pennines. The Trail also forms part of the Midshires Way, a long-distance footpath and bridleway which runs for 225 miles (362 km) through the Midlands from Bledlow to Stockport.
The Tissington Trail runs along a 13 mile route from Ashbourne to Parsley Hay. At this point it joins up with the High Peak Trail, which runs from High Peak Junction to Dowlow near to Buxton. Surrounded by beautiful countryside the traffic-free trail is ideal for horse riders, cyclists, naturalists and walkers. It is suitable for wheel chairs and pushchairs along the flat sections. The trail was originally the trackbed of the Buxton to Ashbourne railway line, built by the LNWR and opened in 1899. In its heyday, it carried express trains from Manchester to London and until after the Second World War a daily train delivered milk from Peak District farms to Finsbury Park, London. Following the closure of the line in the 1960s, it was decided to remove the trackbed and turn the line into a trail for the benefit of walkers, cyclists and horse riders. This experimental scheme was one of the first of its type in the country. It has been great success, since opening to the public in June 1971. Large numbers of people are attracted at weekends throughout the year and every day during peak holiday periods.
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Tissington Trail Car Park, Ashbourne
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habitants recommandent
The Tissington Trail runs along a 13 mile route from Ashbourne to Parsley Hay. At this point it joins up with the High Peak Trail, which runs from High Peak Junction to Dowlow near to Buxton. Surrounded by beautiful countryside the traffic-free trail is ideal for horse riders, cyclists, naturalists and walkers. It is suitable for wheel chairs and pushchairs along the flat sections. The trail was originally the trackbed of the Buxton to Ashbourne railway line, built by the LNWR and opened in 1899. In its heyday, it carried express trains from Manchester to London and until after the Second World War a daily train delivered milk from Peak District farms to Finsbury Park, London. Following the closure of the line in the 1960s, it was decided to remove the trackbed and turn the line into a trail for the benefit of walkers, cyclists and horse riders. This experimental scheme was one of the first of its type in the country. It has been great success, since opening to the public in June 1971. Large numbers of people are attracted at weekends throughout the year and every day during peak holiday periods.
Situated just a 5 minute drive away in Bonsall. Cascades Gardens is a very beautiful and natural 4 acre public garden. Listed by the Daily Mail as one of Britains most inspiring Spring gardens it is designed around a spectacular landscape with a ruined corn mill, old quarry, canal, cliff and stream. Every season brings new surprises with hellebores, unusual perennial flowers, trees, shrubs and conifers. Inspired by Japanese gardens and Buddhist philosophy Cascades Gardens is a celebration of Nature a perfect place to find peace of mind, to relax and reflect. Refreshments are available. A wide range of plants are available in our nursery. Garden Opening Times Garden open everyday to the public from 1st March to 30th September, 10am until 5:00pm Last entry 4pm Group visits also welcome. Talks and Workshops given. Adults: £7.00 / Season Tickets: £18.00 Children (under 15): £3, under 5 free Tel: 01629 822813 Mobile 07967 337404 Our Full address is: Cascades House and Gardens Clatterway, Bonsall, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 2AH http://www.cascadesgardens.com/garden-to-visit-derbyshire/gallery-2/
Cascades Gardens for Meditation and Wellbeing
Situated just a 5 minute drive away in Bonsall. Cascades Gardens is a very beautiful and natural 4 acre public garden. Listed by the Daily Mail as one of Britains most inspiring Spring gardens it is designed around a spectacular landscape with a ruined corn mill, old quarry, canal, cliff and stream. Every season brings new surprises with hellebores, unusual perennial flowers, trees, shrubs and conifers. Inspired by Japanese gardens and Buddhist philosophy Cascades Gardens is a celebration of Nature a perfect place to find peace of mind, to relax and reflect. Refreshments are available. A wide range of plants are available in our nursery. Garden Opening Times Garden open everyday to the public from 1st March to 30th September, 10am until 5:00pm Last entry 4pm Group visits also welcome. Talks and Workshops given. Adults: £7.00 / Season Tickets: £18.00 Children (under 15): £3, under 5 free Tel: 01629 822813 Mobile 07967 337404 Our Full address is: Cascades House and Gardens Clatterway, Bonsall, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 2AH http://www.cascadesgardens.com/garden-to-visit-derbyshire/gallery-2/
Situated around a 25 minute drive from us. Markeaton Park is a large public park located in Markeaton, Derby, 207 acres in size. It attracts one million visitors a year, making it one of the most visited parks in the East Midlands. Markeaton Park is an important part of Derby history, which was sold to the Mundy family in 1516. The Mundy family gave Markeaton Park to Derby City Council in the early 20th century who now provide facilities and events throughout the year. Markeaton Park is a popular destination for walking, cycling and taking picnics. The park has a pitch and putt course, rowing boats, fishing and tennis courts plus the refurbished Grade II listed Orangery Cafe and Craft Village. Children's activities include playgrounds, Skyline High Ropes, paddling pool, donkey rides, a light railway and crazy golf.[1] Behind the modern day park lays a history which can be traced back to the medieval period, when the first park was laid out. Over the following centuries the park went through many changes, from arable fields to an enclosed designed 18th century park and hall and finally at the beginning of the 20th century into the public park of today. The park has many features that mark this history: ancient veteran trees, historic lost roads, old arable field patterns, the 18th century park and buildings and the remains of a Second World War army camp. Address Markeaton Park Markeaton Derby DE22 4AA Telephone General: 01332 640789 Boating: 01332 203596 Email parks@derby.gov.uk
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Markeaton Park
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Situated around a 25 minute drive from us. Markeaton Park is a large public park located in Markeaton, Derby, 207 acres in size. It attracts one million visitors a year, making it one of the most visited parks in the East Midlands. Markeaton Park is an important part of Derby history, which was sold to the Mundy family in 1516. The Mundy family gave Markeaton Park to Derby City Council in the early 20th century who now provide facilities and events throughout the year. Markeaton Park is a popular destination for walking, cycling and taking picnics. The park has a pitch and putt course, rowing boats, fishing and tennis courts plus the refurbished Grade II listed Orangery Cafe and Craft Village. Children's activities include playgrounds, Skyline High Ropes, paddling pool, donkey rides, a light railway and crazy golf.[1] Behind the modern day park lays a history which can be traced back to the medieval period, when the first park was laid out. Over the following centuries the park went through many changes, from arable fields to an enclosed designed 18th century park and hall and finally at the beginning of the 20th century into the public park of today. The park has many features that mark this history: ancient veteran trees, historic lost roads, old arable field patterns, the 18th century park and buildings and the remains of a Second World War army camp. Address Markeaton Park Markeaton Derby DE22 4AA Telephone General: 01332 640789 Boating: 01332 203596 Email parks@derby.gov.uk
Alport Height is a hill near Wirksworth in Derbyshire. It is a popular picnic site, since it has extensive views to the South, and is the first hill over 1,000 ft (300 m) within easy reach of the Derby area. Like Shining Cliff Woods, 2 km to the east, it is in the care of the National Trust. It was one of their first acquisitions in Derbyshire, acquired in 1930. It is possible to see Derby city centre from the summit, as well as The Wrekin, the Long Mynd, and the Clee Hill. It is also possible to see the Sutton Coldfield and Lichfield masts, and the Birmingham city centre skyline, and also the Lickey Hills just beyond Birmingham. The Pye Green BT Tower on Cannock Chase can also be seen. There are eight radio masts and associated buildings in a compound on the summit (not on Trust land). The hill is sometimes known as Alport Stone after the name of the conspicuous pillar of quarried gritstone, some 20 ft (6.1 m) high, near its summit. The boulder has 3 or 4 recognised climbing routes up it, one being an 8 m route of climbing-grade E5. John Gill's bouldering website has early photographs of pioneer climbers in action on the Stone https://www.derbyshirelife.co.uk/out-about/walks/derbyshire-walk-alport-heights-1-6513723
Alport Heights, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Alport Height is a hill near Wirksworth in Derbyshire. It is a popular picnic site, since it has extensive views to the South, and is the first hill over 1,000 ft (300 m) within easy reach of the Derby area. Like Shining Cliff Woods, 2 km to the east, it is in the care of the National Trust. It was one of their first acquisitions in Derbyshire, acquired in 1930. It is possible to see Derby city centre from the summit, as well as The Wrekin, the Long Mynd, and the Clee Hill. It is also possible to see the Sutton Coldfield and Lichfield masts, and the Birmingham city centre skyline, and also the Lickey Hills just beyond Birmingham. The Pye Green BT Tower on Cannock Chase can also be seen. There are eight radio masts and associated buildings in a compound on the summit (not on Trust land). The hill is sometimes known as Alport Stone after the name of the conspicuous pillar of quarried gritstone, some 20 ft (6.1 m) high, near its summit. The boulder has 3 or 4 recognised climbing routes up it, one being an 8 m route of climbing-grade E5. John Gill's bouldering website has early photographs of pioneer climbers in action on the Stone https://www.derbyshirelife.co.uk/out-about/walks/derbyshire-walk-alport-heights-1-6513723
Lovers' Walks, Matlock Bath The Lovers' Walks are a series of footpaths both along the riverside and up and over the precipitous and spectacular cliffs. Woodland still covers all but the paths of Lovers' Walks and is classified along with the High Tor woodlands as ancient, and has been designated as 'Sites of Special Scientific Interest' by English Nature. These woodlands also have wider recognition as they form part of the Peak District Dales Woodlands 'Special Area for Conservation' as they contain habitat which is rare or threatened within a European context and are considered to be one of the best UK examples of 'Tilio-Acerion forests of slopes and ravines'. The Lovers' Walks are connected to Derwent Gardens on the opposite side of the River Derwent by a river bridge built in 1969. Derwent Gardens hosts the District Council's annual Matlock Bath Illuminations spectacular every autumn. The Origin of Lovers' Walks Lovers Walks from the Grand PavilionThe original Lovers' Walks was created sometime prior 1742 and it is believed to be the oldest surviving example of a public pleasure ground and has been in continuous use since the 1740s. The Lovers' Walks, approximately three quarters of a mile in length, was reached via a ferryboat ride from below Bath Terrace. The spectacular focal point for the original Lovers' Walks, was the Cascades, a natural outfall from a thermal spring into the river. Close to the viewing point for the Cascades, a further path was engineered, leading visitors 200 feet up and along the cliff. Contemporary accounts suggest that the original paths were adorned with decorative features such as urns and ornaments. In 1782 Lovers' Walks was part of the estate purchased by Richard Arkwright, and included the land on which the family home, Willersley Castle was built. The Castle grounds were landscaped but separated from Lovers' Walks by a wall placed so the Cascade could be seen from both sides. Visitors wanting to complete the walk to Cromford were escorted through the gate in the wall by the Willersley gardener. By 1785 Birdcage Walk was in existence, extending the Lovers' Walks northwards and adding another path to the top of the cliff, with rustic alcoves created at the top and bottom. It has been suggested that William Emes of Derby, the former Head Gardener at Kedleston Hall was responsible for this development. Until the tree lined promenade along the riverside of the main street through Matlock Bath was completed and opened in 1887 Matlock Bath was hard pressed to cope with influx of day trippers brought by the railway. The Local Board leased land from FC Arkwright on the opposite side of the river to form the Jubilee Grounds. Circular walks were constructed, and in 1893 a bandstand was added. Matlock Bath and Scarthin Nick Urban District Council leased the Lovers' Walks in 1897 and in 1901 joined all of the separate walks together. Turnstiles were added in 1906 and an entry fee charged. The Jubilee Grounds had been used from time to time for temporary attractions. From the 1920s there were aviaries and animal cages for wolves and monkeys, only ending in the 1950s. Since this time the Lovers' Walks have remained largely unchanged, until the recent renovation works via the Matlock Parks Project.
Lovers' Walks
Lovers' Walks, Matlock Bath The Lovers' Walks are a series of footpaths both along the riverside and up and over the precipitous and spectacular cliffs. Woodland still covers all but the paths of Lovers' Walks and is classified along with the High Tor woodlands as ancient, and has been designated as 'Sites of Special Scientific Interest' by English Nature. These woodlands also have wider recognition as they form part of the Peak District Dales Woodlands 'Special Area for Conservation' as they contain habitat which is rare or threatened within a European context and are considered to be one of the best UK examples of 'Tilio-Acerion forests of slopes and ravines'. The Lovers' Walks are connected to Derwent Gardens on the opposite side of the River Derwent by a river bridge built in 1969. Derwent Gardens hosts the District Council's annual Matlock Bath Illuminations spectacular every autumn. The Origin of Lovers' Walks Lovers Walks from the Grand PavilionThe original Lovers' Walks was created sometime prior 1742 and it is believed to be the oldest surviving example of a public pleasure ground and has been in continuous use since the 1740s. The Lovers' Walks, approximately three quarters of a mile in length, was reached via a ferryboat ride from below Bath Terrace. The spectacular focal point for the original Lovers' Walks, was the Cascades, a natural outfall from a thermal spring into the river. Close to the viewing point for the Cascades, a further path was engineered, leading visitors 200 feet up and along the cliff. Contemporary accounts suggest that the original paths were adorned with decorative features such as urns and ornaments. In 1782 Lovers' Walks was part of the estate purchased by Richard Arkwright, and included the land on which the family home, Willersley Castle was built. The Castle grounds were landscaped but separated from Lovers' Walks by a wall placed so the Cascade could be seen from both sides. Visitors wanting to complete the walk to Cromford were escorted through the gate in the wall by the Willersley gardener. By 1785 Birdcage Walk was in existence, extending the Lovers' Walks northwards and adding another path to the top of the cliff, with rustic alcoves created at the top and bottom. It has been suggested that William Emes of Derby, the former Head Gardener at Kedleston Hall was responsible for this development. Until the tree lined promenade along the riverside of the main street through Matlock Bath was completed and opened in 1887 Matlock Bath was hard pressed to cope with influx of day trippers brought by the railway. The Local Board leased land from FC Arkwright on the opposite side of the river to form the Jubilee Grounds. Circular walks were constructed, and in 1893 a bandstand was added. Matlock Bath and Scarthin Nick Urban District Council leased the Lovers' Walks in 1897 and in 1901 joined all of the separate walks together. Turnstiles were added in 1906 and an entry fee charged. The Jubilee Grounds had been used from time to time for temporary attractions. From the 1920s there were aviaries and animal cages for wolves and monkeys, only ending in the 1950s. Since this time the Lovers' Walks have remained largely unchanged, until the recent renovation works via the Matlock Parks Project.
Derwent Gardens, Matlock Bath A formal park located on the southern side of the Pavilion in Matlock Bath, overlooking the River Derwent, Derwent Gardens is also the centrepiece every autumn of Derbyshire Dales District Council's popular Illuminations festival. The distinctive emphasis of the gardens is water. Several thermal springs emerge in the park and have been used to create the water gardens and other pools. Grottos and alcoves also provide unique features within the beautiful gardens. Across a river bridge opened in 1969, the Lovers' Walks can be found - a series of footpaths both along the riverside and up and over the precipitous and spectacular cliffs. The origin of Derwent Gardens Derwent Gardens is the result of the amalgamation of two distinct areas, the Ferry Grounds and the Orchard Holme. Orchard Holme is the original name for the southern section of Derwent Gardens and here several thermal springs have their outfall to the river. Having been cleared of trees in the mid nineteenth century the site was used as a rubbish tip by the Royal Hotel. However Herbert Buxton, a local businessman, bought the site in 1880 and erected a gravity powered roller coaster which opened amid great excitement in 1889. Buxton also offered more traditional amusements including landscaped gardens, thermal fishponds, a petrifying well and a café. The roller coaster survived until 1934 when the grounds appear to have fallen into disrepair. The land was requisitioned by the army during World War II and after the war some of the former army buildings were used to house a variety of attractions including an aquarium, and aviary. The gardens were purchased by Matlock Urban District Council in 1951 and were used as an amusement area until 1967. Fireworks at Matlock Bath IlluminationsWhen the original Promenade location for the Illuminations was lost during the A6 road widening in 1968, Derwent Gardens became the new home. In 1984, Derbyshire Dales District Council took over the responsibility for the gardens and illuminations when the Illuminations Committee went into liquidation. The Ferry Grounds forming the top end of what is now known as Derwent Gardens contained landing stages which had been in existence since the eighteenth century. This formed an important element of the local leisure industry housing the ferry and also being used for both boating and for national swimming competitions. The area between the landing stage and the main road remained rough ground and housed the entrance to the Providence Lead Mine. Many fairs and travelling shows set up on this area. In 1897 the Matlock Bath and Scarthin Nick Urban District Council leased the Ferry grounds to obtain access to the Lovers' Walks which it also leased the same year. The Council purchased this land in 1908 under the auspices of the 1905 Improvement Act. In 1911 the Kursaal, now known as the Pavilion, was built, and the grounds landscaped.
Derwent Gardens
Derwent Gardens, Matlock Bath A formal park located on the southern side of the Pavilion in Matlock Bath, overlooking the River Derwent, Derwent Gardens is also the centrepiece every autumn of Derbyshire Dales District Council's popular Illuminations festival. The distinctive emphasis of the gardens is water. Several thermal springs emerge in the park and have been used to create the water gardens and other pools. Grottos and alcoves also provide unique features within the beautiful gardens. Across a river bridge opened in 1969, the Lovers' Walks can be found - a series of footpaths both along the riverside and up and over the precipitous and spectacular cliffs. The origin of Derwent Gardens Derwent Gardens is the result of the amalgamation of two distinct areas, the Ferry Grounds and the Orchard Holme. Orchard Holme is the original name for the southern section of Derwent Gardens and here several thermal springs have their outfall to the river. Having been cleared of trees in the mid nineteenth century the site was used as a rubbish tip by the Royal Hotel. However Herbert Buxton, a local businessman, bought the site in 1880 and erected a gravity powered roller coaster which opened amid great excitement in 1889. Buxton also offered more traditional amusements including landscaped gardens, thermal fishponds, a petrifying well and a café. The roller coaster survived until 1934 when the grounds appear to have fallen into disrepair. The land was requisitioned by the army during World War II and after the war some of the former army buildings were used to house a variety of attractions including an aquarium, and aviary. The gardens were purchased by Matlock Urban District Council in 1951 and were used as an amusement area until 1967. Fireworks at Matlock Bath IlluminationsWhen the original Promenade location for the Illuminations was lost during the A6 road widening in 1968, Derwent Gardens became the new home. In 1984, Derbyshire Dales District Council took over the responsibility for the gardens and illuminations when the Illuminations Committee went into liquidation. The Ferry Grounds forming the top end of what is now known as Derwent Gardens contained landing stages which had been in existence since the eighteenth century. This formed an important element of the local leisure industry housing the ferry and also being used for both boating and for national swimming competitions. The area between the landing stage and the main road remained rough ground and housed the entrance to the Providence Lead Mine. Many fairs and travelling shows set up on this area. In 1897 the Matlock Bath and Scarthin Nick Urban District Council leased the Ferry grounds to obtain access to the Lovers' Walks which it also leased the same year. The Council purchased this land in 1908 under the auspices of the 1905 Improvement Act. In 1911 the Kursaal, now known as the Pavilion, was built, and the grounds landscaped.
Situated north of Hathersage, Stanage Edge is a popular place for walkers and for rock climbing with stunning views of the Dark Peak moorlands and the Hope Valley. The gritstone edge stretches for approximately 4 miles and was recently featured in the classic film ‘Pride & Prejudice’ starring Keira Knightley. Car Parks: Hollins Bank & Picnic area (SK237837) Hook’s Car (SK246829) Dennis Knoll (SK228843)
Stanage Edge
Situated north of Hathersage, Stanage Edge is a popular place for walkers and for rock climbing with stunning views of the Dark Peak moorlands and the Hope Valley. The gritstone edge stretches for approximately 4 miles and was recently featured in the classic film ‘Pride & Prejudice’ starring Keira Knightley. Car Parks: Hollins Bank & Picnic area (SK237837) Hook’s Car (SK246829) Dennis Knoll (SK228843)
Dovedale is known for the River Dove and it’s impressive limestone ravines, but the most iconic part of a trip to Dovedale has to be the picturesque stepping stones… Arriving at the nearby car park, where you can also be tempted by snacks and refreshments, it’s just a short walk up and across a wooden bridge to get to the River Dove, where you can look up onto Thorpe Cloud. Thorpe Cloud is an isolated limestone hill, also known as a reef knoll, which sits between the villages of Ilam and Thorpe and lies right on the border between Derbyshire and Staffordshire. It’s highest point has an elevation of 287 metres, which is quite a quick and steep ascent, but one with lots of hike-worthy views across the Staffordshire and Derbyshire countryside once you’re at the top. If you are planning on walking to the top of Thorpe Cloud do remember to bring a good pair of walking boots with you, as the way down the hill can sometimes be a tad tricky. Following the River Dove up towards the stepping stones you can cross and climb to the top of Thorpe Cloud, giving fantastic panoramic views of the Peak District. For a more family friendly walk, you can continue up passed Thorpe Cloud and carry on up along the river. There’s lots of great wildlife and woodland to explore along this riverside stroll, and the path is very clear and flat which is a plus point for families with small children. If you’d rather take more of a walk to enjoy the Peak District countryside and arrive in Dovedale along the way, there are a few good locations to start. For example, the River Dove flows through Milldale, which is a great starting point for the walk down through Dovedale to the stepping stones, as well as Wolfscote Dale and Beresford Dale. Here there are also a network of footpaths and walks either along the river or over the surrounding countryside. Derbyshire, DE6 2AY
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Dovedale Stepping Stones
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Dovedale is known for the River Dove and it’s impressive limestone ravines, but the most iconic part of a trip to Dovedale has to be the picturesque stepping stones… Arriving at the nearby car park, where you can also be tempted by snacks and refreshments, it’s just a short walk up and across a wooden bridge to get to the River Dove, where you can look up onto Thorpe Cloud. Thorpe Cloud is an isolated limestone hill, also known as a reef knoll, which sits between the villages of Ilam and Thorpe and lies right on the border between Derbyshire and Staffordshire. It’s highest point has an elevation of 287 metres, which is quite a quick and steep ascent, but one with lots of hike-worthy views across the Staffordshire and Derbyshire countryside once you’re at the top. If you are planning on walking to the top of Thorpe Cloud do remember to bring a good pair of walking boots with you, as the way down the hill can sometimes be a tad tricky. Following the River Dove up towards the stepping stones you can cross and climb to the top of Thorpe Cloud, giving fantastic panoramic views of the Peak District. For a more family friendly walk, you can continue up passed Thorpe Cloud and carry on up along the river. There’s lots of great wildlife and woodland to explore along this riverside stroll, and the path is very clear and flat which is a plus point for families with small children. If you’d rather take more of a walk to enjoy the Peak District countryside and arrive in Dovedale along the way, there are a few good locations to start. For example, the River Dove flows through Milldale, which is a great starting point for the walk down through Dovedale to the stepping stones, as well as Wolfscote Dale and Beresford Dale. Here there are also a network of footpaths and walks either along the river or over the surrounding countryside. Derbyshire, DE6 2AY
At the top end of Bradford Dale are the remains of a tiny disused pumping station, paid for by the Bateman family of nearby Middleton-by-Youlgreave, where a water turbine was used years ago to supply the village before mains water pipes were laid. Fullwood Rock in Bradford Dale is named after Sir Christopher Fullwood who was a staunch Royalist and raised an army of 1,000 men, mainly comprising of lead miners from surrounding villages. His home at Middleton Castle was surprised by Roundheads in the Civil War and battle broke out. Amid the canon fire Sir Christopher fled into Bradford Dale and hid in a fissure between the boulder and rock face, but was found. He was seriously wounded from a gunshot but taken prisoner and whilst being transported to a distant gaol, he died of his injuries at Caulton in Staffordshire on November 16th 1643. Middleton Castle was then destroyed as an example to other Royalists, but Fullwood Rock was named in his honour. Bradford Dale contains a series of wonderful little bridges spanning the river including a clapper bridge and three packhorse bridges. Prior to the tradition of well dressing in Youlgreave, the wooden framework is left in the River Bradford to soak before being plastered with clay and painstakingly adorned with an intricate and detailed picture made up of petals and organic materials. After reaching the clapper bridge below Youlgreave, Bradford Dale opens out and runs through a lush meadow where cattle and sheep graze. There are a couple of benches overlooking the river as at one point a concrete dam has been constructed to create a swimming pool where bathers can enjoy a splash and the rare experience of swimming in natural river water - when it is warm enough to undress! Beyond Youlgreave the River Bradford runs downstream to Alport, a picturesque little hamlet made up of chocolate box pretty cottages with mature gardens running down to the waters edge. Here the River Bradford marries with the River Lathkill before heading over Alport Weir and running east to join forces with the River Wye. There are well walked paths in Bradford Dale which are easy to follow. A section of the dale forms part of the Limestone Way which is a long distance route leading from Castleton in the north to Rocester near Ashbourne.
River Bradford
At the top end of Bradford Dale are the remains of a tiny disused pumping station, paid for by the Bateman family of nearby Middleton-by-Youlgreave, where a water turbine was used years ago to supply the village before mains water pipes were laid. Fullwood Rock in Bradford Dale is named after Sir Christopher Fullwood who was a staunch Royalist and raised an army of 1,000 men, mainly comprising of lead miners from surrounding villages. His home at Middleton Castle was surprised by Roundheads in the Civil War and battle broke out. Amid the canon fire Sir Christopher fled into Bradford Dale and hid in a fissure between the boulder and rock face, but was found. He was seriously wounded from a gunshot but taken prisoner and whilst being transported to a distant gaol, he died of his injuries at Caulton in Staffordshire on November 16th 1643. Middleton Castle was then destroyed as an example to other Royalists, but Fullwood Rock was named in his honour. Bradford Dale contains a series of wonderful little bridges spanning the river including a clapper bridge and three packhorse bridges. Prior to the tradition of well dressing in Youlgreave, the wooden framework is left in the River Bradford to soak before being plastered with clay and painstakingly adorned with an intricate and detailed picture made up of petals and organic materials. After reaching the clapper bridge below Youlgreave, Bradford Dale opens out and runs through a lush meadow where cattle and sheep graze. There are a couple of benches overlooking the river as at one point a concrete dam has been constructed to create a swimming pool where bathers can enjoy a splash and the rare experience of swimming in natural river water - when it is warm enough to undress! Beyond Youlgreave the River Bradford runs downstream to Alport, a picturesque little hamlet made up of chocolate box pretty cottages with mature gardens running down to the waters edge. Here the River Bradford marries with the River Lathkill before heading over Alport Weir and running east to join forces with the River Wye. There are well walked paths in Bradford Dale which are easy to follow. A section of the dale forms part of the Limestone Way which is a long distance route leading from Castleton in the north to Rocester near Ashbourne.
A Peak District beauty spot in the truest sense of the word, Lathkill Dale, one of Britain's finest limestone valleys, is situated about 3 miles from the historic market town of Bakewell. The name derives from the Old Norse 'hlatha-gyll', which means barn in a narrow valley'. The steep sided dale begins at Monyash as a shallow dry riverbed and runs some 5km west-east to the picturesque village of Alport. The dale features beautiful broadleaved woodland, grasslands, rock outcrops and scree, waterfalls, caves, historic mining remains and a range of wildlife habitats. The River Lathkill is one of the Peak District’s finest trout fishing rivers. The river rises from the ground at Lathkill Head Cave about half a mile down the valley from Monyash. Below Over Haddon water bubbles up from swallet holes to flow into deep pools known locally as The Blue Waters. The water in the river is usually unusually clear, and Charles Cotton wrote in The Compleat Angler that it is: “ ... by many degrees, the purest and most transparent stream that I ever saw, either at home or abroad, and breeds, it is said, the reddest and best Trouts in England. The upper part of the dale is a National Nature Reserve, owned by English Nature and can be accessed via several paths. The reserve is famous for its large variety of wild flowers, which include germander speedwell, vetch, cowslips, pink campion, greater stitchwort, lady's bedstraw, common rock rose, the beautiful early purple orchid and the rare, blue-flowered Jacobs Ladder (pictured below left). There are several Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI’s), whilst birds of prey include buzzards, kestrels and goshawks. Dippers, wagtails, voles and even kingfishers can be sighted on the banks of the river. Below Lathkill Head Cave the valley widens and further down is joined from the south by Cales Dale, where the the remains of an old sheepwash can be seen which was still in use up until the 1940s. The medieval Conksbury Bridge (OS Grid ref- SK211656) carries the road from Bakewell to Youlgreave, the old packhorse bridge stands beside a quaint summer house and fish breeding pools owned by the Rutland Estate at nearby Haddon Hall. The dale has a history of lead mining, and among the trees on the north side of the valley can be seen the remains of the Mandale Mine, which dates to the nineteenth century and includes an old aqueduct and the ruined pump house. Ricklow Quarry contains 360 million year old fossils. The quarry was worked for a stone called ' Derbyshire Grey marble', which was used to make some of the fireplaces at Chatsworth House. The view down the dale from the top of the Ricklow Quarry steps is one of the finest. Car parks are provided at at Over Haddon, Moor Lane, Youlgrave and Conksbury Bridge
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Lathkill Dale
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A Peak District beauty spot in the truest sense of the word, Lathkill Dale, one of Britain's finest limestone valleys, is situated about 3 miles from the historic market town of Bakewell. The name derives from the Old Norse 'hlatha-gyll', which means barn in a narrow valley'. The steep sided dale begins at Monyash as a shallow dry riverbed and runs some 5km west-east to the picturesque village of Alport. The dale features beautiful broadleaved woodland, grasslands, rock outcrops and scree, waterfalls, caves, historic mining remains and a range of wildlife habitats. The River Lathkill is one of the Peak District’s finest trout fishing rivers. The river rises from the ground at Lathkill Head Cave about half a mile down the valley from Monyash. Below Over Haddon water bubbles up from swallet holes to flow into deep pools known locally as The Blue Waters. The water in the river is usually unusually clear, and Charles Cotton wrote in The Compleat Angler that it is: “ ... by many degrees, the purest and most transparent stream that I ever saw, either at home or abroad, and breeds, it is said, the reddest and best Trouts in England. The upper part of the dale is a National Nature Reserve, owned by English Nature and can be accessed via several paths. The reserve is famous for its large variety of wild flowers, which include germander speedwell, vetch, cowslips, pink campion, greater stitchwort, lady's bedstraw, common rock rose, the beautiful early purple orchid and the rare, blue-flowered Jacobs Ladder (pictured below left). There are several Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI’s), whilst birds of prey include buzzards, kestrels and goshawks. Dippers, wagtails, voles and even kingfishers can be sighted on the banks of the river. Below Lathkill Head Cave the valley widens and further down is joined from the south by Cales Dale, where the the remains of an old sheepwash can be seen which was still in use up until the 1940s. The medieval Conksbury Bridge (OS Grid ref- SK211656) carries the road from Bakewell to Youlgreave, the old packhorse bridge stands beside a quaint summer house and fish breeding pools owned by the Rutland Estate at nearby Haddon Hall. The dale has a history of lead mining, and among the trees on the north side of the valley can be seen the remains of the Mandale Mine, which dates to the nineteenth century and includes an old aqueduct and the ruined pump house. Ricklow Quarry contains 360 million year old fossils. The quarry was worked for a stone called ' Derbyshire Grey marble', which was used to make some of the fireplaces at Chatsworth House. The view down the dale from the top of the Ricklow Quarry steps is one of the finest. Car parks are provided at at Over Haddon, Moor Lane, Youlgrave and Conksbury Bridge
You'd be hard pushed to find a more magical spot than Padley Gorge. With gently flowing streams and tumbling waterfalls in a woodland setting near the Longshaw Estate and Grindleford, Padley Gorge is photogenic and full of character. Unsurprisingly, it's also surrounded by great walks and is a popular spot for picnics and paddling. Padley Gorge is just 1/2 mile from the National Trust's beautiful Longshaw Estate. It is between the village of Grindleford and the A6187 road. You can park at Grindleford and scramble up Upper Padley, or at Surprise View car park. Cross the road and head through the rocks until you get to Padley Gorge. Alternatively you can park at the Longshaw Estate and take a flat path, way marked trail route past the pond and down to Padley Gorge. This is a lovely walk.
Padley Gorge
You'd be hard pushed to find a more magical spot than Padley Gorge. With gently flowing streams and tumbling waterfalls in a woodland setting near the Longshaw Estate and Grindleford, Padley Gorge is photogenic and full of character. Unsurprisingly, it's also surrounded by great walks and is a popular spot for picnics and paddling. Padley Gorge is just 1/2 mile from the National Trust's beautiful Longshaw Estate. It is between the village of Grindleford and the A6187 road. You can park at Grindleford and scramble up Upper Padley, or at Surprise View car park. Cross the road and head through the rocks until you get to Padley Gorge. Alternatively you can park at the Longshaw Estate and take a flat path, way marked trail route past the pond and down to Padley Gorge. This is a lovely walk.
Entertainment & Activities
Whether you’d like to try kayaking, sailing or fishing or like to hire a bike visit Carsington Sports & Leisure or you can go sailing. WALKING & CYCLING Explore the vast network of paths and trails that circumnavigate Carsington Water – on foot or by bike. Bikes are available to hire from the Watersports centre, or you can bring your own!
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Carsington Water
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Whether you’d like to try kayaking, sailing or fishing or like to hire a bike visit Carsington Sports & Leisure or you can go sailing. WALKING & CYCLING Explore the vast network of paths and trails that circumnavigate Carsington Water – on foot or by bike. Bikes are available to hire from the Watersports centre, or you can bring your own!
The National Tramway Museum (trading as Crich Tramway Village) is located at Crich, Derbyshire, England. The museum contains over 60 (mainly British) trams built between 1873 and 1982 and is set within a recreated period village containing a working pub, cafe, old-style sweet shop and tram depots. The museum's collection of trams runs through the village-setting with visitors transported one-mile out into the local countryside and back. The museum is operated by the Tramway Museum Society, a registered charity. The trams at Crich mostly ran in cities in the United Kingdom prior to the 1960s, with trams rescued (even from other countries) as the systems closed. Most of the UK tram networks, with a few exceptions closed before the 1960s. The last to close was Glasgow Corporation Tramways in 1962, a tramway well represented at the museum, leaving just the Blackpool tramway as the sole surviving first-generation tramway. There has been a recent revival in the use of trams, with new networks opened including Croydon Tramlink, Sheffield Supertram, Midland Metro, Edinburgh Trams, Manchester Metrolink and the nearby Nottingham Express Transit being built and extended. https://www.tramway.co.uk/
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Crich Tramway Museum
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The National Tramway Museum (trading as Crich Tramway Village) is located at Crich, Derbyshire, England. The museum contains over 60 (mainly British) trams built between 1873 and 1982 and is set within a recreated period village containing a working pub, cafe, old-style sweet shop and tram depots. The museum's collection of trams runs through the village-setting with visitors transported one-mile out into the local countryside and back. The museum is operated by the Tramway Museum Society, a registered charity. The trams at Crich mostly ran in cities in the United Kingdom prior to the 1960s, with trams rescued (even from other countries) as the systems closed. Most of the UK tram networks, with a few exceptions closed before the 1960s. The last to close was Glasgow Corporation Tramways in 1962, a tramway well represented at the museum, leaving just the Blackpool tramway as the sole surviving first-generation tramway. There has been a recent revival in the use of trams, with new networks opened including Croydon Tramlink, Sheffield Supertram, Midland Metro, Edinburgh Trams, Manchester Metrolink and the nearby Nottingham Express Transit being built and extended. https://www.tramway.co.uk/
Discover thrilling rides and amazing attractions at Gulliver's Kingdom Matlock Bath. Located on the edge of the Peak District National Park, Gulliver's Kingdom is a unique theme park experience. Enjoy adrenanline-fueled adventures all with spectacular views thanks to our impressive hillside setting. Climb high above the Crows Nest Quest or take a ride on the log flume, 300ft above Derwent Valley! We don’t have lots of additional theme park prices at Gulliver's, parking is completely free. Book your theme park tickets in advance to save even more on your giant adventure. Short break packages are available too at Gulliver's Matlock Bath, stay in a unique themed family suite. Choose from princess, pirate, wizard and promenade themes. Due to the nature of some of our rides and attractions, visitors are advised not to wear open-toed footwear. Gullivers Kingdom Temple Walk, Matlock Bath, Matlock DE4 3PG https://www.gulliverskingdomresort.co.uk/
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Gulliver's Kingdom
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Discover thrilling rides and amazing attractions at Gulliver's Kingdom Matlock Bath. Located on the edge of the Peak District National Park, Gulliver's Kingdom is a unique theme park experience. Enjoy adrenanline-fueled adventures all with spectacular views thanks to our impressive hillside setting. Climb high above the Crows Nest Quest or take a ride on the log flume, 300ft above Derwent Valley! We don’t have lots of additional theme park prices at Gulliver's, parking is completely free. Book your theme park tickets in advance to save even more on your giant adventure. Short break packages are available too at Gulliver's Matlock Bath, stay in a unique themed family suite. Choose from princess, pirate, wizard and promenade themes. Due to the nature of some of our rides and attractions, visitors are advised not to wear open-toed footwear. Gullivers Kingdom Temple Walk, Matlock Bath, Matlock DE4 3PG https://www.gulliverskingdomresort.co.uk/
Just a 30 - 35 minute drive from us Alton Towers is a theme park in Staffordshire, England, near the village of Alton. The park is operated by Merlin Entertainments Group and incorporates a theme park, water park, spa, mini golf and hotel complex. Originally a private estate, Alton Towers grounds opened to the public in 1860 to raise funds. In the late 20th century, it was transformed into a theme park and opened a number of new rides from 1980 onwards. In 2017, it was the second most visited theme park in the UK after Legoland Windsor. The park has many attractions such as Congo River Rapids, Runaway Mine Train, Nemesis, Oblivion, Galactica, The Smiler, and Wicker Man. It operates a total of ten roller coasters and offers a range of accommodation and lodging options alongside the theme park. Facilities include Alton Towers Waterpark, conference facilities, a crazy golf course, and a high ropes course. The theme park is usually open from mid-March to early November, whilst many of its hotels and amenities are open year-round. The theme park is occasionally closed midweek in the quieter months. Special events are hosted throughout the year, including Alton Towers Scarefest (the park's Halloween event), and a season-ending fireworks display held on the last three days of the season. https://www.altontowers.com/
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Alton Towers
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Just a 30 - 35 minute drive from us Alton Towers is a theme park in Staffordshire, England, near the village of Alton. The park is operated by Merlin Entertainments Group and incorporates a theme park, water park, spa, mini golf and hotel complex. Originally a private estate, Alton Towers grounds opened to the public in 1860 to raise funds. In the late 20th century, it was transformed into a theme park and opened a number of new rides from 1980 onwards. In 2017, it was the second most visited theme park in the UK after Legoland Windsor. The park has many attractions such as Congo River Rapids, Runaway Mine Train, Nemesis, Oblivion, Galactica, The Smiler, and Wicker Man. It operates a total of ten roller coasters and offers a range of accommodation and lodging options alongside the theme park. Facilities include Alton Towers Waterpark, conference facilities, a crazy golf course, and a high ropes course. The theme park is usually open from mid-March to early November, whilst many of its hotels and amenities are open year-round. The theme park is occasionally closed midweek in the quieter months. Special events are hosted throughout the year, including Alton Towers Scarefest (the park's Halloween event), and a season-ending fireworks display held on the last three days of the season. https://www.altontowers.com/
Sightseeing
The Heritage Centre is Derbyshire’s newest visitor attraction, completed in April 2019, with support from the National Lottery Heritage Fund. Opened by writer and broadcaster Matthew Parris, who described it as ‘vivid’ and ‘fabulously reborn’, it tells an amazing more than 1,000 year story of a small town physically carved out of the Peak District. There’s something for everyone - history, exhibitions, special events, space to relax and a place to start, and finish your exploration of the Gem of the Peak. For full information please go to our website wirksworthheritage.co.uk
Wirksworth Heritage Centre
31 St John's St
The Heritage Centre is Derbyshire’s newest visitor attraction, completed in April 2019, with support from the National Lottery Heritage Fund. Opened by writer and broadcaster Matthew Parris, who described it as ‘vivid’ and ‘fabulously reborn’, it tells an amazing more than 1,000 year story of a small town physically carved out of the Peak District. There’s something for everyone - history, exhibitions, special events, space to relax and a place to start, and finish your exploration of the Gem of the Peak. For full information please go to our website wirksworthheritage.co.uk
Run by a small group of volunteers and set within six former limestone quarries in the heart of the Derbyshire Dales, open every day from 10am & free entry Impressum The National Stone Centre is a registered charity (Charity no. 516799; Company number 01817304). The NSC is established to advance throughout the UK public education in: • the formation, evolution and use of stone, its geological, physical, chemical and other properties, and the products made from stone; • the stone mining, quarrying, and treatment industries, their history, evolution, development and modern practices; • all facets of the environment containing or bearing stone and of its geology, ecology and natural history; • the impact of stone-related industries on the environment and the preservation, conservation, restoration and treatment of land, buildings, machines, structures and artefacts used by those industries. The National Stone Centre a 50 acre site of Special Geological Scientific Interest offering outdoor and indoor activities for all and run by a small group of volunteers. It is set within six former limestone quarries in the heart of the Derbyshire Dales, on the edge of the Peak District National Park, and close to the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site. • Outdoor fossil trails around our free to access site • Discovery Centre with shop, café and exhibition • "Geo" walks and picnic areas • Practical courses in stone carving, dry stone walling and other country crafts.
National Stone Centre
Run by a small group of volunteers and set within six former limestone quarries in the heart of the Derbyshire Dales, open every day from 10am & free entry Impressum The National Stone Centre is a registered charity (Charity no. 516799; Company number 01817304). The NSC is established to advance throughout the UK public education in: • the formation, evolution and use of stone, its geological, physical, chemical and other properties, and the products made from stone; • the stone mining, quarrying, and treatment industries, their history, evolution, development and modern practices; • all facets of the environment containing or bearing stone and of its geology, ecology and natural history; • the impact of stone-related industries on the environment and the preservation, conservation, restoration and treatment of land, buildings, machines, structures and artefacts used by those industries. The National Stone Centre a 50 acre site of Special Geological Scientific Interest offering outdoor and indoor activities for all and run by a small group of volunteers. It is set within six former limestone quarries in the heart of the Derbyshire Dales, on the edge of the Peak District National Park, and close to the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site. • Outdoor fossil trails around our free to access site • Discovery Centre with shop, café and exhibition • "Geo" walks and picnic areas • Practical courses in stone carving, dry stone walling and other country crafts.
Middleton Top is the last surviving complete winding engine house built by the Cromford & High Peak Railway Co and still contains its original pair of beam engines, built by the Butterley Company in 1829, together with its boilers and imposing chimney. The Cromford & High Peak Railway Co was created by Act of Parliament on 2nd May 1825 for the purpose of linking the Cromford Canal with the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge. This connection was intended to provide a through route from the north and east midlands to Manchester and the south Lancashire region avoiding the long Trent and Mersey Canal journey. The proposed line had been surveyed during 1824 by Josias Jessop and when it opened, in two stages, in 1830 and 1831, was 335/8 miles in length; slightly longer than the Liverpool & Manchester Railway. The one major hurdle which the engineer had to overcome was Derbyshire's bleak High Peak region which rises one thousand feet between the two canals. No locomotives then or now could climb steeply inclined rails and Jessop's answer to the problem was to use a series of powered inclined planes linking long, nearly level sections of line suitable for either locomotives or horses; in fact, the railway's gradient profile was similar to a canal. When the line opened there were no less then nine inclined planes throughout its length, eight employing steam winding engines in distinctive gritstone engine houses to haul wagons up and down. Each incline was equipped with double track to enable wagons to be moved in both directions at the same time as well as being balanced for safety and economy of operation. The winding engine at Middleton Top was the third one from the beginning of the line at High Peak Wharf on the Cromford Canal. The first two inclines achieved rises of 204 feet and 261 feet and Middleton lifted the line a further 253 feet to nearly 1,000 feet above sea level - and all in the distance of three and a half miles. Two more shallower inclines took the railway to its summit of 1,266 feet (990 feet above Cromford canal) before commencing its descent towards Whaley Bridge. Middleton incline was just over 700 yards long at an angle of 1 in 8¼, similar to the first two. Of the eight winding engines along the line, two comprised pairs of 10 horse power beam engines and the other six were pairs of 20 horse power engines, Middleton being of the larger type. Besides the remarkable pair of beam engines, Middleton Top engine house also contains a collection of railwayana, tools and miscellaneous items relating to the Cromford & High Peak line and to the winding engine and adjacent to the building is the engine keeper’s house, albeit much altered. This incline ceased working in 1963 and, after the closure of the rest of the line by British Railways in 1967, part of the route including Middleton Top engine house was acquired by Derbyshire County Council. The engine was restored by the Middleton Engine Group and the entire scheduled ancient monument, which includes the incline and terminal wheel, also received the attention of Derbyshire Archaeological Society's Industrial Archaeological Section and the county council.
Middleton Top Visitor & Cycle Hire Centres
Middleton Top is the last surviving complete winding engine house built by the Cromford & High Peak Railway Co and still contains its original pair of beam engines, built by the Butterley Company in 1829, together with its boilers and imposing chimney. The Cromford & High Peak Railway Co was created by Act of Parliament on 2nd May 1825 for the purpose of linking the Cromford Canal with the Peak Forest Canal at Whaley Bridge. This connection was intended to provide a through route from the north and east midlands to Manchester and the south Lancashire region avoiding the long Trent and Mersey Canal journey. The proposed line had been surveyed during 1824 by Josias Jessop and when it opened, in two stages, in 1830 and 1831, was 335/8 miles in length; slightly longer than the Liverpool & Manchester Railway. The one major hurdle which the engineer had to overcome was Derbyshire's bleak High Peak region which rises one thousand feet between the two canals. No locomotives then or now could climb steeply inclined rails and Jessop's answer to the problem was to use a series of powered inclined planes linking long, nearly level sections of line suitable for either locomotives or horses; in fact, the railway's gradient profile was similar to a canal. When the line opened there were no less then nine inclined planes throughout its length, eight employing steam winding engines in distinctive gritstone engine houses to haul wagons up and down. Each incline was equipped with double track to enable wagons to be moved in both directions at the same time as well as being balanced for safety and economy of operation. The winding engine at Middleton Top was the third one from the beginning of the line at High Peak Wharf on the Cromford Canal. The first two inclines achieved rises of 204 feet and 261 feet and Middleton lifted the line a further 253 feet to nearly 1,000 feet above sea level - and all in the distance of three and a half miles. Two more shallower inclines took the railway to its summit of 1,266 feet (990 feet above Cromford canal) before commencing its descent towards Whaley Bridge. Middleton incline was just over 700 yards long at an angle of 1 in 8¼, similar to the first two. Of the eight winding engines along the line, two comprised pairs of 10 horse power beam engines and the other six were pairs of 20 horse power engines, Middleton being of the larger type. Besides the remarkable pair of beam engines, Middleton Top engine house also contains a collection of railwayana, tools and miscellaneous items relating to the Cromford & High Peak line and to the winding engine and adjacent to the building is the engine keeper’s house, albeit much altered. This incline ceased working in 1963 and, after the closure of the rest of the line by British Railways in 1967, part of the route including Middleton Top engine house was acquired by Derbyshire County Council. The engine was restored by the Middleton Engine Group and the entire scheduled ancient monument, which includes the incline and terminal wheel, also received the attention of Derbyshire Archaeological Society's Industrial Archaeological Section and the county council.
Cromford Mills is a free-to-enter, UNESCO World Heritage Site and your complete day out with family and friends. It is owned and managed by The Arkwright Society - an educational charity devoted to the rescue of the industrial heritage buildings and helping to preserve the precious built and natural landscape in and around Cromford. The Society was formed in 1972, growing out of the Arkwright Festival Committee which ran a local celebration. This commemorated the bicentenary of Sir Richard Arkwright’s first Cromford Mill and the construction of the world’s first successful water powered cotton spinning mill in 1771. From the beginning, the Society has been engaged in the practical conservation of industrial monuments (notably in Lumsdale, Cromford and Slinter Wood), in publishing, and educational activities. It has also helped countless numbers of people access training and work, and transformed Cromford Mill from a derelict site doomed to demolition to one of World Heritage Status, employing over 100 staff in numerous small businesses. The Society has adopted its own green code and is actively involved in recycling waste materials. The Arkwright Society purchased the mill site in 1979 as an act of rescue and in the early 1980s began to implement its long-term economic plan. The strategy identified the buildings that were not required for the Society’s own uses and so could be repaired and leased to tenants. The aim was to create a rental income to cross subsidise the Society’s overheads and the costs of delivering services to the general public visiting the site. In the early 1990s the Society developed further income streams from a restaurant and shops run by its trading arm, Cromford Mill Limited. Many of the buildings have now been brought back into economic use and the site has a visitor centre, creative industries managed workspace, two restaurants, several meeting rooms, office accommodation for rental, galleries and several shops.
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The Arkwright Society
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Cromford Mills is a free-to-enter, UNESCO World Heritage Site and your complete day out with family and friends. It is owned and managed by The Arkwright Society - an educational charity devoted to the rescue of the industrial heritage buildings and helping to preserve the precious built and natural landscape in and around Cromford. The Society was formed in 1972, growing out of the Arkwright Festival Committee which ran a local celebration. This commemorated the bicentenary of Sir Richard Arkwright’s first Cromford Mill and the construction of the world’s first successful water powered cotton spinning mill in 1771. From the beginning, the Society has been engaged in the practical conservation of industrial monuments (notably in Lumsdale, Cromford and Slinter Wood), in publishing, and educational activities. It has also helped countless numbers of people access training and work, and transformed Cromford Mill from a derelict site doomed to demolition to one of World Heritage Status, employing over 100 staff in numerous small businesses. The Society has adopted its own green code and is actively involved in recycling waste materials. The Arkwright Society purchased the mill site in 1979 as an act of rescue and in the early 1980s began to implement its long-term economic plan. The strategy identified the buildings that were not required for the Society’s own uses and so could be repaired and leased to tenants. The aim was to create a rental income to cross subsidise the Society’s overheads and the costs of delivering services to the general public visiting the site. In the early 1990s the Society developed further income streams from a restaurant and shops run by its trading arm, Cromford Mill Limited. Many of the buildings have now been brought back into economic use and the site has a visitor centre, creative industries managed workspace, two restaurants, several meeting rooms, office accommodation for rental, galleries and several shops.
The Cromford Canal ran 14.5 miles (23.3 kilometres) from Cromford to the Erewash Canal in Derbyshire, England with a branch to Pinxton. Built by William Jessop with the assistance of Benjamin Outram, its alignment included four tunnels and 14 locks.[1] From Cromford it ran south following the 275-foot (84 m) contour line along the east side of the valley of the Derwent to Ambergate, where it turned eastwards along the Amber valley. It turned sharply to cross the valley, crossing the river and the Ambergate to Nottingham road, by means of an aqueduct at Bullbridge, before turning towards Ripley. From there the Butterley Tunnel took it through to the Erewash Valley. From the tunnel it continued to Ironville, the junction for the branch to Pinxton, and then descended through fourteen locks to meet the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill. The Pinxton Branch became important as a route for Nottinghamshire coal, via the Erewash, to the River Trent and Leicester and was a terminus of the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway. A 6-mile (9.7 km) long section of the Cromford canal between Cromford and Ambergate is listed as a Biological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)[2][3] and a Local Nature Reserve.[4][5] In addition to purely canal traffic, there was a lively freight interchange with the Cromford and High Peak Railway, which traversed the plateau of the Peak District from Whaley Bridge in the north west, and which descended to the canal at High Peak Junction by means of an inclined plane.
Cromford Canal
The Cromford Canal ran 14.5 miles (23.3 kilometres) from Cromford to the Erewash Canal in Derbyshire, England with a branch to Pinxton. Built by William Jessop with the assistance of Benjamin Outram, its alignment included four tunnels and 14 locks.[1] From Cromford it ran south following the 275-foot (84 m) contour line along the east side of the valley of the Derwent to Ambergate, where it turned eastwards along the Amber valley. It turned sharply to cross the valley, crossing the river and the Ambergate to Nottingham road, by means of an aqueduct at Bullbridge, before turning towards Ripley. From there the Butterley Tunnel took it through to the Erewash Valley. From the tunnel it continued to Ironville, the junction for the branch to Pinxton, and then descended through fourteen locks to meet the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill. The Pinxton Branch became important as a route for Nottinghamshire coal, via the Erewash, to the River Trent and Leicester and was a terminus of the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway. A 6-mile (9.7 km) long section of the Cromford canal between Cromford and Ambergate is listed as a Biological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)[2][3] and a Local Nature Reserve.[4][5] In addition to purely canal traffic, there was a lively freight interchange with the Cromford and High Peak Railway, which traversed the plateau of the Peak District from Whaley Bridge in the north west, and which descended to the canal at High Peak Junction by means of an inclined plane.
Take a flight across the Derwent Valley in our famous cable cars to discover a unique 60 acre hill top estate of heritage stories, breathtaking views and fascinating attractions. Derbyshire’s award-winning landmark attraction Two guided underground tours through historic caverns Your cable car ticket allows you free access to all the attractions and exhibitions at the summit, including two famous caverns: The Great Masson Cavern and the Rutland Cavern & Nestus Mine. Professional guided tours take place throughout the day.
Heights of Abraham Cafe
Take a flight across the Derwent Valley in our famous cable cars to discover a unique 60 acre hill top estate of heritage stories, breathtaking views and fascinating attractions. Derbyshire’s award-winning landmark attraction Two guided underground tours through historic caverns Your cable car ticket allows you free access to all the attractions and exhibitions at the summit, including two famous caverns: The Great Masson Cavern and the Rutland Cavern & Nestus Mine. Professional guided tours take place throughout the day.
Matlock Bath is the gateway to the Peak District and blessed with breath-taking scenery, once described by Byron as 'a romantic fragment of Switzerland set in the heart of England'. The Aquarium and Exhibitions are located in a wonderful Victorian building in the centre of Matlock Bath, this is a popular collection of unique attractions for all the family to visit and enjoy. As well as our fascinating Aquarium that houses over 50 species of fish there is : One of the largest public displays of Holograms in Europe. The Thermal Pool which is the home of our famous Carp collection. The site of the only remaining 'Petrifying well' in Matlock Bath. A beautiful worldwide Gemstone & Fossil display. A wonderful trip down memory lane in our 'Past Times in Matlock Bath' Exhibition. A private collection of Goss and Crested China. totaling over 1,700 pieces.
Matlock Bath Aquarium and arcade
Matlock Bath is the gateway to the Peak District and blessed with breath-taking scenery, once described by Byron as 'a romantic fragment of Switzerland set in the heart of England'. The Aquarium and Exhibitions are located in a wonderful Victorian building in the centre of Matlock Bath, this is a popular collection of unique attractions for all the family to visit and enjoy. As well as our fascinating Aquarium that houses over 50 species of fish there is : One of the largest public displays of Holograms in Europe. The Thermal Pool which is the home of our famous Carp collection. The site of the only remaining 'Petrifying well' in Matlock Bath. A beautiful worldwide Gemstone & Fossil display. A wonderful trip down memory lane in our 'Past Times in Matlock Bath' Exhibition. A private collection of Goss and Crested China. totaling over 1,700 pieces.
The Museum houses thousands of items, relics of the lost lead industry, which are explained and interpreted in an imaginative and thought-provoking exhibition. These include hundreds of rock and mineral specimens from around the world. Interactive exhibits and climbing tunnels, provide something for the young and the young at heart. Our Top 3 Exhibits The Wills Founder Water Pressure Engine This massive pumping engine is the centre-piece of the museum. It was built in Coalbrookdale in 1819, a feat of engineering, and resourcefully used the pressure created by falling water to pump water from deep underground. Climbing and crawling tunnels The three mock-mine tunnels in the museum are favourites for many of our visitors, of all ages! The Howie Mineral Collection Professor Howie donated over 3000 mineral specimens from around the world to the museum, which had been collected throughout his lifetime. A large selection of these are on display. We do not have space to display them all!
Peak District Mining Museum
196 S Parade
The Museum houses thousands of items, relics of the lost lead industry, which are explained and interpreted in an imaginative and thought-provoking exhibition. These include hundreds of rock and mineral specimens from around the world. Interactive exhibits and climbing tunnels, provide something for the young and the young at heart. Our Top 3 Exhibits The Wills Founder Water Pressure Engine This massive pumping engine is the centre-piece of the museum. It was built in Coalbrookdale in 1819, a feat of engineering, and resourcefully used the pressure created by falling water to pump water from deep underground. Climbing and crawling tunnels The three mock-mine tunnels in the museum are favourites for many of our visitors, of all ages! The Howie Mineral Collection Professor Howie donated over 3000 mineral specimens from around the world to the museum, which had been collected throughout his lifetime. A large selection of these are on display. We do not have space to display them all!
Nestled in the Derwent Valley, High Peak Junction was the hub of transport activity and is now a true haven of heritage and wildlife. It's literally the junction of the Cromford Canal and the High Peak Trail. It lies a mile to the south east of Cromford village and is in the beautiful Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site. It is a haven for wildlife and is the ideal location for a stroll or a heritage or nature walk. There are a variety of buildings from the former Cromford and High Peak Railway - one of the first long distance railways which was built on canal principles. The Cromford Canal can be explored between Cromford Wharf and Ambergate, a distance of just over five miles. The High Peak Trail starts here at High Peak Junction and continues for 17.5 miles to Dowlow near Buxton. For information and a warm welcome call in at the High Peak Junction Visitor Centre where there are refreshments, gifts and a variety of maps, walk leaflets and books. Here you can step back in time with the fascinating Audiotour for a small fee of £1, where you will discover the history of Cromford Canal and the Cromford and High Peak Railway. You can also visit the old Railway Workshops for free. A canal aqueduct over the River Derwent and the magnificent Leawood Pump House are just a few minutes walk away. Leawood Pump is a steam powered beam engine which operates on some summer weekends and bank holidays. A number of waymarked walks start from High Peak Junction. Wildlife The canal is a haven for wildlife (it is a Site of Special Scientific Interest). Little grebes and water voles can be seen throughout the year, in summer look out for dragonflies, damselflies and hoverflies. Access High Peak Junction and Cromford Wharf car parks are signed from the A6 at Cromford. There are regular bus services. Railway stations at Cromford, Whatstandwell and Ambergate are only a few minutes walk away from the canal. High Peak Junction Visitor Centre - the centre is signposted from the A6 at Cromford.
High Peak Junction
Nestled in the Derwent Valley, High Peak Junction was the hub of transport activity and is now a true haven of heritage and wildlife. It's literally the junction of the Cromford Canal and the High Peak Trail. It lies a mile to the south east of Cromford village and is in the beautiful Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site. It is a haven for wildlife and is the ideal location for a stroll or a heritage or nature walk. There are a variety of buildings from the former Cromford and High Peak Railway - one of the first long distance railways which was built on canal principles. The Cromford Canal can be explored between Cromford Wharf and Ambergate, a distance of just over five miles. The High Peak Trail starts here at High Peak Junction and continues for 17.5 miles to Dowlow near Buxton. For information and a warm welcome call in at the High Peak Junction Visitor Centre where there are refreshments, gifts and a variety of maps, walk leaflets and books. Here you can step back in time with the fascinating Audiotour for a small fee of £1, where you will discover the history of Cromford Canal and the Cromford and High Peak Railway. You can also visit the old Railway Workshops for free. A canal aqueduct over the River Derwent and the magnificent Leawood Pump House are just a few minutes walk away. Leawood Pump is a steam powered beam engine which operates on some summer weekends and bank holidays. A number of waymarked walks start from High Peak Junction. Wildlife The canal is a haven for wildlife (it is a Site of Special Scientific Interest). Little grebes and water voles can be seen throughout the year, in summer look out for dragonflies, damselflies and hoverflies. Access High Peak Junction and Cromford Wharf car parks are signed from the A6 at Cromford. There are regular bus services. Railway stations at Cromford, Whatstandwell and Ambergate are only a few minutes walk away from the canal. High Peak Junction Visitor Centre - the centre is signposted from the A6 at Cromford.
Middleton Top Engine House is the sole survivor of nine that once stood at the top of every incline along the Cromford and High Peak Railway. It is designated as an Ancient Monument, together with its Butterley beam engine which in the past hauled the cables up the track. Derbyshire County Council are now the custodians of this important piece of our railway heritage, visited by enthusiasts from all over the world. Situated at the top of Middleton Incline on the High Peak Trail is the restored Middleton Top Engine House, which was built in 1829. In the past it was used to haul wagons up the incline, but although those days have long since gone, it can still be seen in motion on the dates set out below. Originally timber was supplied daily to fire the boilers, now it is compressed air that does the job.
Middleton Top Visitor & Cycle Hire Centres
Middleton Top Engine House is the sole survivor of nine that once stood at the top of every incline along the Cromford and High Peak Railway. It is designated as an Ancient Monument, together with its Butterley beam engine which in the past hauled the cables up the track. Derbyshire County Council are now the custodians of this important piece of our railway heritage, visited by enthusiasts from all over the world. Situated at the top of Middleton Incline on the High Peak Trail is the restored Middleton Top Engine House, which was built in 1829. In the past it was used to haul wagons up the incline, but although those days have long since gone, it can still be seen in motion on the dates set out below. Originally timber was supplied daily to fire the boilers, now it is compressed air that does the job.
The Lumsdale Valley is a site of national archaeological and historic importance. It is owned by the Arkwright Society, an educational charity devoted to the rescue of the industrial heritage buildings & associated landscape. The mills and the associated water management features form one of the best examples in Great Britain of a water-powered industrial archaeological site. Its uniqueness comes from seeing such an extensive use of water power in such a relatively small area. There is no designated parking in the Valley and vehicular access in the Valley is for residents only. Visitors are encouraged to park in Matlock town centre and walk to the Valley. There are also buses that run regularly along the Chesterfield Road (A 632) past the top of the Valley. Please take care when walking down through the Valley. The route is steep, muddy and uneven, with steps and some sharp drops to the sides. Please keep to the paths. There are no toilet/refreshment facilities or children’s play areas anywhere in the Valley. Picnicking, paddling, swimming and climbing in the Valley are not allowed due to the risk of damage to the fragile mill ruins and the natural environment. Please help us to take care of this very special place by respecting the wildlife, keeping to the paths, not climbing on the ruins - and taking your litter home with you.
Lumsdale
The Lumsdale Valley is a site of national archaeological and historic importance. It is owned by the Arkwright Society, an educational charity devoted to the rescue of the industrial heritage buildings & associated landscape. The mills and the associated water management features form one of the best examples in Great Britain of a water-powered industrial archaeological site. Its uniqueness comes from seeing such an extensive use of water power in such a relatively small area. There is no designated parking in the Valley and vehicular access in the Valley is for residents only. Visitors are encouraged to park in Matlock town centre and walk to the Valley. There are also buses that run regularly along the Chesterfield Road (A 632) past the top of the Valley. Please take care when walking down through the Valley. The route is steep, muddy and uneven, with steps and some sharp drops to the sides. Please keep to the paths. There are no toilet/refreshment facilities or children’s play areas anywhere in the Valley. Picnicking, paddling, swimming and climbing in the Valley are not allowed due to the risk of damage to the fragile mill ruins and the natural environment. Please help us to take care of this very special place by respecting the wildlife, keeping to the paths, not climbing on the ruins - and taking your litter home with you.
Situated about 15-20 minute drive from us Haddon is 900 years old, has been owned by one family for the duration of its existence and is believed to be one of the most important historic houses in the Western World. Haddon is held in such esteem, as it was left under lock and key by its owners for more than 200 years from the reign of Queen Anne to the late 19th Century, resulting in its interiors, from the 14th Century to early Elizabethan period, being left untouched and for you to see. It is the great survivor and there is nowhere else like it. When you visit, you will step back in time. ‘Sleeping Beauty’ When the lock was turned on Haddon, its contents were left on the walls and on the floors. The dais table remained on its step in the Banqueting Hall, the tapestries on the walls, the fire dogs in the hearths, the pewter in the cupboards. Over the ages, it became known as the ‘Sleeping Beauty’, a perfect name and reference for this fairy tale, castle-like home. A home now returned to by its family after 300 years and a home that, because of its past and story, now houses the most important Early English Furniture collection in England and a nationally important collection of tapestries. Explore Unlike many other stately houses, there is no set route for you to walk on your visit to Haddon. Instead you are given a map and are free to explore. You will find the oldest medieval kitchens in England, which retain all their original features, including the stock pot, chopping boards, baking ovens, work tops and butchery. You will enter the family’s private chapel, which is still adorned by its original exquisite fresco seccoes from the fourteenth century on its walls. You can explore the medieval chambers and you will find the 110ft Long Gallery, reputed to be in the most beautiful room in England, with its glorious, sparkling, bombée glass windows and spectacular paneling designed by the celebrated Elizabethan, Robert Smythson. Step outside… …And you will enter Haddon’s Elizabethan Walled Gardens, an equally rare survival of the past. Robert Smythson designed these when he designed the Long Gallery, and they sit intimately with the architecture of the hall. Renowned for their beauty, structure and views, the gardens are arranged in a series of terraces, retained by enormous buttresses that cascade down to the River Wye with seemingly endless views over the ancient parkland and Peak District National Park beyond. Recently replanted by Chelsea Gold winning Arne Maynard, the gardens of Haddon are famous for their roses and are profoundly romantic, with an ancient feel to them. Enjoy: strolling the terraces; the colour filled herbaceous borders; the knot garden that frames jewel plants of the Elizabethan age; and the wild flower meadow borders carefully punctuated by topiary of Hornbeam and Beech. Or why not find a quiet corner, sit and relax and while-away the time. Experience a Sense of Place As Haddon survived, so did much of its original medieval parkland. Dated to the 14th century and now grade 1 listed, this land is as it was 700 years ago. It has retained all its characteristics and landscape features from its days as a deer park, designed for the pursuit of hunting. Adult (16 and above) £18.50 Concession (Over 60) £17.00 Student (With a valid ID) £15.00 Child (Age 0-15) FREE Historic Houses (HH) Members Free admission with valid card (excluding special events and Christmas season) Gardeners World Free admission for one full paying adult with a valid 2-for-1 entry card (excluding Christmas season) Address: Haddon Hall Bakewell Derbyshire DE45 1LA T: 01629 812 855 E: info@haddonhall.co.uk
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Haddon Hall
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Situated about 15-20 minute drive from us Haddon is 900 years old, has been owned by one family for the duration of its existence and is believed to be one of the most important historic houses in the Western World. Haddon is held in such esteem, as it was left under lock and key by its owners for more than 200 years from the reign of Queen Anne to the late 19th Century, resulting in its interiors, from the 14th Century to early Elizabethan period, being left untouched and for you to see. It is the great survivor and there is nowhere else like it. When you visit, you will step back in time. ‘Sleeping Beauty’ When the lock was turned on Haddon, its contents were left on the walls and on the floors. The dais table remained on its step in the Banqueting Hall, the tapestries on the walls, the fire dogs in the hearths, the pewter in the cupboards. Over the ages, it became known as the ‘Sleeping Beauty’, a perfect name and reference for this fairy tale, castle-like home. A home now returned to by its family after 300 years and a home that, because of its past and story, now houses the most important Early English Furniture collection in England and a nationally important collection of tapestries. Explore Unlike many other stately houses, there is no set route for you to walk on your visit to Haddon. Instead you are given a map and are free to explore. You will find the oldest medieval kitchens in England, which retain all their original features, including the stock pot, chopping boards, baking ovens, work tops and butchery. You will enter the family’s private chapel, which is still adorned by its original exquisite fresco seccoes from the fourteenth century on its walls. You can explore the medieval chambers and you will find the 110ft Long Gallery, reputed to be in the most beautiful room in England, with its glorious, sparkling, bombée glass windows and spectacular paneling designed by the celebrated Elizabethan, Robert Smythson. Step outside… …And you will enter Haddon’s Elizabethan Walled Gardens, an equally rare survival of the past. Robert Smythson designed these when he designed the Long Gallery, and they sit intimately with the architecture of the hall. Renowned for their beauty, structure and views, the gardens are arranged in a series of terraces, retained by enormous buttresses that cascade down to the River Wye with seemingly endless views over the ancient parkland and Peak District National Park beyond. Recently replanted by Chelsea Gold winning Arne Maynard, the gardens of Haddon are famous for their roses and are profoundly romantic, with an ancient feel to them. Enjoy: strolling the terraces; the colour filled herbaceous borders; the knot garden that frames jewel plants of the Elizabethan age; and the wild flower meadow borders carefully punctuated by topiary of Hornbeam and Beech. Or why not find a quiet corner, sit and relax and while-away the time. Experience a Sense of Place As Haddon survived, so did much of its original medieval parkland. Dated to the 14th century and now grade 1 listed, this land is as it was 700 years ago. It has retained all its characteristics and landscape features from its days as a deer park, designed for the pursuit of hunting. Adult (16 and above) £18.50 Concession (Over 60) £17.00 Student (With a valid ID) £15.00 Child (Age 0-15) FREE Historic Houses (HH) Members Free admission with valid card (excluding special events and Christmas season) Gardeners World Free admission for one full paying adult with a valid 2-for-1 entry card (excluding Christmas season) Address: Haddon Hall Bakewell Derbyshire DE45 1LA T: 01629 812 855 E: info@haddonhall.co.uk
Around 20 minute drive from us The house, many of its contents and 737 hectares (1,822 acres) of the surrounding landscape are leased to a registered charity, the Chatsworth House Trust, established in 1981. The 12th Duke and Duchess pay rent to the charity to live at Chatsworth and work with the charity and others to welcome Chatsworth’s visitors. Every penny of visitor admission goes directly to the Chatsworth House Trust, which is dedicated to the long-term preservation of Chatsworth House, the collections, garden, woodlands and park for the long-term benefit of the public. During the corona virus you need to book in advance to visit Chatsworth. Book tickets The garden and car parks are open with increased safety measures in place. Pre-booking is essential. Garden tickets include access to the house car park for one car per transaction. There is a strict limit on the number of cars allowed in the car parks. All visitors, including Blue Badge holders, must book tickets online before arrival; no tickets will be available to purchase on site at Chatsworth. Anyone arriving without a ticket will not be able to access the car parks. On arrival, please follow the guidance stated on signs, and respect social distancing when getting in and out of your car. https://www.chatsworth.org/book-tickets/
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Chatsworth House
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Around 20 minute drive from us The house, many of its contents and 737 hectares (1,822 acres) of the surrounding landscape are leased to a registered charity, the Chatsworth House Trust, established in 1981. The 12th Duke and Duchess pay rent to the charity to live at Chatsworth and work with the charity and others to welcome Chatsworth’s visitors. Every penny of visitor admission goes directly to the Chatsworth House Trust, which is dedicated to the long-term preservation of Chatsworth House, the collections, garden, woodlands and park for the long-term benefit of the public. During the corona virus you need to book in advance to visit Chatsworth. Book tickets The garden and car parks are open with increased safety measures in place. Pre-booking is essential. Garden tickets include access to the house car park for one car per transaction. There is a strict limit on the number of cars allowed in the car parks. All visitors, including Blue Badge holders, must book tickets online before arrival; no tickets will be available to purchase on site at Chatsworth. Anyone arriving without a ticket will not be able to access the car parks. On arrival, please follow the guidance stated on signs, and respect social distancing when getting in and out of your car. https://www.chatsworth.org/book-tickets/
Situated around 7 minute drive from us or you can even walk there from our accommodation. StarDisc is a 21st century stone circle and celestial amphitheatre created by Aidan Shingler. It spans 12 meters (40 ft). Carved into black granite is a star chart that mirrors the northern hemisphere’s night sky. The surface of the stone circle is inscribed with the constellations, their names, and a depiction of the Milky Way. Contrasting with the star chart is a perimeter of silver granite on which 12 seats are positioned. The seats denote the months of the year. Dark skies sensitive lighting illuminates StarDsic powered by our nearest star the Sun. ​ StarDisc was unveiled on September 10th 2011 by BBC The Sky at Night presenter Pete Lawrence. From conception to completion, this artist lead initiative had taken six years. More than one thousand celebrants attended the launch, which was supported by esteemed amateur astronomer Sir Patrick Moore. The event included an under the stars screening of Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Location: Stoney Wood, Wirksworth, Derbyshire, UK, Planet Earth Latitude: 53.0859 N Longitude: 1.5781 W Grid Reference: SK 28356 54381 Designated Parking for Stoney Wood: DE4 4FR ​Pedestrian and Disabled Access: DE4 4EN
StarDisc
Situated around 7 minute drive from us or you can even walk there from our accommodation. StarDisc is a 21st century stone circle and celestial amphitheatre created by Aidan Shingler. It spans 12 meters (40 ft). Carved into black granite is a star chart that mirrors the northern hemisphere’s night sky. The surface of the stone circle is inscribed with the constellations, their names, and a depiction of the Milky Way. Contrasting with the star chart is a perimeter of silver granite on which 12 seats are positioned. The seats denote the months of the year. Dark skies sensitive lighting illuminates StarDsic powered by our nearest star the Sun. ​ StarDisc was unveiled on September 10th 2011 by BBC The Sky at Night presenter Pete Lawrence. From conception to completion, this artist lead initiative had taken six years. More than one thousand celebrants attended the launch, which was supported by esteemed amateur astronomer Sir Patrick Moore. The event included an under the stars screening of Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Location: Stoney Wood, Wirksworth, Derbyshire, UK, Planet Earth Latitude: 53.0859 N Longitude: 1.5781 W Grid Reference: SK 28356 54381 Designated Parking for Stoney Wood: DE4 4FR ​Pedestrian and Disabled Access: DE4 4EN
Located just a 5 minute drive from us or 30 minute walk. Ecclesbourne Valley Railway - Escape to the Countryside on board Derbyshire's longest heritage railway! The line runs for 9 miles from Duffield to the market town of Wirksworth, calling at Shottle and Idridgehay. Beyond Wirksworth, there is Ravenstor at the top of an unusual 1 in 27 incline. Ticket Prices Day Rover Our Day Rover tickets are valid all day so give you the freedom to just do one return journey, ride more than once or hop and off to explore the local area. Adults - £14.50; Concessions - £13.50; Children - £7.50; Family (two adults and up to three children) - £38.50 Discounts are available when purchasing online in advance of the day you wish to travel. We also offer one-year unlimited travel passes which are available online or in the Ticket Office, priced at £85.00 per adult or £99.00 per family of five (two adults and up to three children). Single (One Way) Whether it be enjoying the challenge of walking the Ecclesbourne Way or you just fancy a taster journey, a single ticket gets you from one end of the line to the other without returning. Adults - £8.00; Concessions - £7.00; Children - £4.00; Family (two adults and up to three children) - £22.00 Special Events Special events (usually Orange days) may have different fares which will be published with the information about that event. Other Tickets Single and return tickets are available when travelling to and between Shottle and Idridgehay. Click here to open our full fares list. Available Discounts We have a range of travel discounts and incentives available including: Concession fares for the disabled, employees of National Rail companies, students and members of other heritage railways Appropriate child rate fares for disabled carers, members of the HRA Interrail Pass scheme, Caravan Club members, Blue Light Card holders and Defence Card holders https://wyvernrail.digitickets.co.uk/tickets
Ecclesbourne Valley Railway
Located just a 5 minute drive from us or 30 minute walk. Ecclesbourne Valley Railway - Escape to the Countryside on board Derbyshire's longest heritage railway! The line runs for 9 miles from Duffield to the market town of Wirksworth, calling at Shottle and Idridgehay. Beyond Wirksworth, there is Ravenstor at the top of an unusual 1 in 27 incline. Ticket Prices Day Rover Our Day Rover tickets are valid all day so give you the freedom to just do one return journey, ride more than once or hop and off to explore the local area. Adults - £14.50; Concessions - £13.50; Children - £7.50; Family (two adults and up to three children) - £38.50 Discounts are available when purchasing online in advance of the day you wish to travel. We also offer one-year unlimited travel passes which are available online or in the Ticket Office, priced at £85.00 per adult or £99.00 per family of five (two adults and up to three children). Single (One Way) Whether it be enjoying the challenge of walking the Ecclesbourne Way or you just fancy a taster journey, a single ticket gets you from one end of the line to the other without returning. Adults - £8.00; Concessions - £7.00; Children - £4.00; Family (two adults and up to three children) - £22.00 Special Events Special events (usually Orange days) may have different fares which will be published with the information about that event. Other Tickets Single and return tickets are available when travelling to and between Shottle and Idridgehay. Click here to open our full fares list. Available Discounts We have a range of travel discounts and incentives available including: Concession fares for the disabled, employees of National Rail companies, students and members of other heritage railways Appropriate child rate fares for disabled carers, members of the HRA Interrail Pass scheme, Caravan Club members, Blue Light Card holders and Defence Card holders https://wyvernrail.digitickets.co.uk/tickets
Peak Rail is a preserved railway in Derbyshire, England, which operates a steam and heritage diesel service for tourists and visitors to both the Peak District and the Derbyshire Dales. The preserved railway line is over three and a half miles (5.6 km) in length and, as of April 2016, operates train services from Matlock station (shared with Derwent Valley Line services from Derby via Ambergate) via the site of Matlock Riverside and Darley Dale to Rowsley South. Peak Rail intends to extend its operational services northward to Bakewell when resources allow, extending to a total of 4.25 miles (6.84 km). Beyond Bakewell, the railway trackbed is used by the Monsal Trail. TICKET TYPE ALL DAY UNLIMITED TICKET PRICE SINGLE JOURNEY TICKET PRICE Adult £9.50 £5.00 Senior Citizen £8.00 £4.50 Children under 3 years (maximum of two per paying adult) FREE FREE Children 3 - 15 years £4.50 £2.75 Family (2 Adults and up to 3 children) £30.50 £15.50 These fares apply to normal operating days only. FARES MAY CHANGE FOR SOME SPECIAL EVENTS. £1.50 off ticket prices on the 15:56 from Rowsley South Station only (Return Journey). This discount only applies to normal operating dates and is not applicable for groups. https://www.peakrail.co.uk/
Peak Rail
Peak Rail is a preserved railway in Derbyshire, England, which operates a steam and heritage diesel service for tourists and visitors to both the Peak District and the Derbyshire Dales. The preserved railway line is over three and a half miles (5.6 km) in length and, as of April 2016, operates train services from Matlock station (shared with Derwent Valley Line services from Derby via Ambergate) via the site of Matlock Riverside and Darley Dale to Rowsley South. Peak Rail intends to extend its operational services northward to Bakewell when resources allow, extending to a total of 4.25 miles (6.84 km). Beyond Bakewell, the railway trackbed is used by the Monsal Trail. TICKET TYPE ALL DAY UNLIMITED TICKET PRICE SINGLE JOURNEY TICKET PRICE Adult £9.50 £5.00 Senior Citizen £8.00 £4.50 Children under 3 years (maximum of two per paying adult) FREE FREE Children 3 - 15 years £4.50 £2.75 Family (2 Adults and up to 3 children) £30.50 £15.50 These fares apply to normal operating days only. FARES MAY CHANGE FOR SOME SPECIAL EVENTS. £1.50 off ticket prices on the 15:56 from Rowsley South Station only (Return Journey). This discount only applies to normal operating dates and is not applicable for groups. https://www.peakrail.co.uk/
St Mary is the largest church in our team. It stands in a churchyard long since closed for burials, which now provides green space in the centre of the town. Its cruciform shape provides a fascinating space for the visitor to explore the many corners in which wonderful discoveries in stone and marble are to be found. The market town of Wirksworth has a good number of shops, schools eating places and pubs for the visitor to discover and is fast becoming a popular tourist destination in the Derbyshire Dales. The annual Wirksworth Arts Festival sprang out of the celebration of the church’s patronal festival . The traditional “clypping” service on that day involves the congregation joining hands around the church to embrace or “clypp” it. Call us on 01629 824707. Please ring us on this number for enquiries. Postal Address: St Marys Gate, Wirksworth DE4 4DQ email: teamoffice@wirksworthteamministry.co.uk
St Mary's Church, Wirksworth
St Mary is the largest church in our team. It stands in a churchyard long since closed for burials, which now provides green space in the centre of the town. Its cruciform shape provides a fascinating space for the visitor to explore the many corners in which wonderful discoveries in stone and marble are to be found. The market town of Wirksworth has a good number of shops, schools eating places and pubs for the visitor to discover and is fast becoming a popular tourist destination in the Derbyshire Dales. The annual Wirksworth Arts Festival sprang out of the celebration of the church’s patronal festival . The traditional “clypping” service on that day involves the congregation joining hands around the church to embrace or “clypp” it. Call us on 01629 824707. Please ring us on this number for enquiries. Postal Address: St Marys Gate, Wirksworth DE4 4DQ email: teamoffice@wirksworthteamministry.co.uk