Aller directement au contenu

Lindsay's Guidebook

Lindsay

Lindsay's Guidebook

Sightseeing
With its winding cobbled streets, welcoming Market Place and handsome Tudor and Georgian heritage, picturesque Ashbourne is known as 'The Gateway to Dovedale'. While there's no doubt that it's the perfect base if you want to explore the spectacular limestone landscapes of the southern White Peak, it also pays to take a leisurely walking tour around town to immerse yourself in its fascinating history and architecture. With more than 200 listed buildings - including historic almshouses, fine coaching inns and genteel town houses - it's a visual feast for the discerning visitor. Don't miss the splendid facade of the Grade I listed Old Grammar School, the 'longest inn sign in the world' at The Greenman public house on St John Street; or the beautiful St Oswald's Parish Church with its striking 212 feet high spire, described by classic author George Eliot as the 'finest single spire in England'. Another highlight is the 17th century mansion, once home to the 'King of Ashbourne', Dr. John Taylor, where Lichfield-born Dr. Samuel Johnson, author of the first-ever English dictionary, was a frequent visitor in the 1700s. Ashbourne also has some fascinating foodie links. The original recipe for Ashbourne Gingerbread was acquired from French prisoners of war - in particular the personal chef of a captured French general - who were kept in the town during the Napoleonic wars (1799-1815). The timber-framed Gingerbread Shop - now a Birds Bakery - can still be seen in St John Street and the Original Ashbourne Gingerbread can be purchased locally. Shopping is pure pleasure thanks to its plethora of small, family-run businesses and weekly open-air market. Browse for fine antiques, quality food and drink, designer fashion and much more, then relax over morning coffee, lunch or afternoon tea in a selection of cafés, inns and tea rooms. Ashbourne is also famous for its ancient tradition of Royal Shrovetide Football - 'turned up', or started, by such famous figures as Prince Charles, Sir Stanley Matthews and The Duke of Devonshire. Played each Shrovetide Tuesday and Ash Wednesday, it's a unique and unruly event that bears little resemblance to the modern game! Walkers, cyclists and horse riders will appreciate the fact that the town also sits at the start of the traffic-free Tissington Trail - a green gateway to Dovedale and the Pennine Bridleway, linking up further north with the popular High Peak Trail.
41
habitants recommandent
Ashbourne
41
habitants recommandent
With its winding cobbled streets, welcoming Market Place and handsome Tudor and Georgian heritage, picturesque Ashbourne is known as 'The Gateway to Dovedale'. While there's no doubt that it's the perfect base if you want to explore the spectacular limestone landscapes of the southern White Peak, it also pays to take a leisurely walking tour around town to immerse yourself in its fascinating history and architecture. With more than 200 listed buildings - including historic almshouses, fine coaching inns and genteel town houses - it's a visual feast for the discerning visitor. Don't miss the splendid facade of the Grade I listed Old Grammar School, the 'longest inn sign in the world' at The Greenman public house on St John Street; or the beautiful St Oswald's Parish Church with its striking 212 feet high spire, described by classic author George Eliot as the 'finest single spire in England'. Another highlight is the 17th century mansion, once home to the 'King of Ashbourne', Dr. John Taylor, where Lichfield-born Dr. Samuel Johnson, author of the first-ever English dictionary, was a frequent visitor in the 1700s. Ashbourne also has some fascinating foodie links. The original recipe for Ashbourne Gingerbread was acquired from French prisoners of war - in particular the personal chef of a captured French general - who were kept in the town during the Napoleonic wars (1799-1815). The timber-framed Gingerbread Shop - now a Birds Bakery - can still be seen in St John Street and the Original Ashbourne Gingerbread can be purchased locally. Shopping is pure pleasure thanks to its plethora of small, family-run businesses and weekly open-air market. Browse for fine antiques, quality food and drink, designer fashion and much more, then relax over morning coffee, lunch or afternoon tea in a selection of cafés, inns and tea rooms. Ashbourne is also famous for its ancient tradition of Royal Shrovetide Football - 'turned up', or started, by such famous figures as Prince Charles, Sir Stanley Matthews and The Duke of Devonshire. Played each Shrovetide Tuesday and Ash Wednesday, it's a unique and unruly event that bears little resemblance to the modern game! Walkers, cyclists and horse riders will appreciate the fact that the town also sits at the start of the traffic-free Tissington Trail - a green gateway to Dovedale and the Pennine Bridleway, linking up further north with the popular High Peak Trail.
Ashbourne it's a great location for visiting all of the Derbyshire attractions it has great restaurants wine bars and country pubs and cafes and has lot more to offer.
Market Place
Ashbourne it's a great location for visiting all of the Derbyshire attractions it has great restaurants wine bars and country pubs and cafes and has lot more to offer.
this is a great place to start a short or a long walk or great for cycling you can hire bikes on the trail or in ashbourne it's virtually all flat
Tunnel entrance, Tissington Trail
this is a great place to start a short or a long walk or great for cycling you can hire bikes on the trail or in ashbourne it's virtually all flat
A perfect picture book village with beautiful cottages built around a noble old hall, fine church and duck pond. Whichever way you enter Tissington you get a pleasant surprise for this village is as near to a rural idyll as you can get. From the main gates on the A515 Ashbourne to Buxton Road an elegant avenue of lime trees leads to the first of the pretty cottages alongside the broad wayside lawns. The lane from Bradbourne sets off through a ford and winds along, up and down, before slipping into the village by the pond. The village has been the home of the FitzHerbert family for over 400 years and it is their splendid Jacobean residence at the Hall that forms the centrepiece of the beautiful picture that is Tissington. The church of St Mary is raised up above the village and has a splendid Norman tower and has many fine memorials to the FitzHerbert family. Things to do; Tissington Hall is open to visitors at certain times and there are tearooms, gift shops and craft shops. The tradition of Well Dressing is said to have originated here and on Ascension Day five wells are decorated in a floral tribute to God for the gift of water. The Tissington Trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders passes by the village, where there is parking and a picnic site. The route follows the old Buxton to Ashbourne railway line passing through some spectacular scenery. The Limestone Way footpath goes through Tissington and there are good routes all around for ramblers. you must try the cream teas.
9
habitants recommandent
Tissington
9
habitants recommandent
A perfect picture book village with beautiful cottages built around a noble old hall, fine church and duck pond. Whichever way you enter Tissington you get a pleasant surprise for this village is as near to a rural idyll as you can get. From the main gates on the A515 Ashbourne to Buxton Road an elegant avenue of lime trees leads to the first of the pretty cottages alongside the broad wayside lawns. The lane from Bradbourne sets off through a ford and winds along, up and down, before slipping into the village by the pond. The village has been the home of the FitzHerbert family for over 400 years and it is their splendid Jacobean residence at the Hall that forms the centrepiece of the beautiful picture that is Tissington. The church of St Mary is raised up above the village and has a splendid Norman tower and has many fine memorials to the FitzHerbert family. Things to do; Tissington Hall is open to visitors at certain times and there are tearooms, gift shops and craft shops. The tradition of Well Dressing is said to have originated here and on Ascension Day five wells are decorated in a floral tribute to God for the gift of water. The Tissington Trail for walkers, cyclists and horse riders passes by the village, where there is parking and a picnic site. The route follows the old Buxton to Ashbourne railway line passing through some spectacular scenery. The Limestone Way footpath goes through Tissington and there are good routes all around for ramblers. you must try the cream teas.
Dovedale is known for the River Dove and it’s impressive limestone ravines, but the most iconic part of a trip to Dovedale has to be the picturesque stepping stones… Arriving at the nearby car park, where you can also be tempted by snacks and refreshments, it’s just a short walk up and across a wooden bridge to get to the River Dove, where you can look up onto Thorpe Cloud. Thorpe Cloud is an isolated limestone hill, also known as a reef knoll, which sits between the villages of Ilam and Thorpe and lies right on the border between Derbyshire and Staffordshire. It’s highest point has an elevation of 287 metres, which is quite a quick and steep ascent, but one with lots of hike-worthy views across the Staffordshire and Derbyshire countryside once you’re at the top. If you are planning on walking to the top of Thorpe Cloud do remember to bring a good pair of walking boots with you, as the way down the hill can sometimes be a tad tricky. Following the River Dove up towards the stepping stones you can cross and climb to the top of Thorpe Cloud, giving fantastic panoramic views of the Peak District. For a more family friendly walk, you can continue up passed Thorpe Cloud and carry on up along the river. There’s lots of great wildlife and woodland to explore along this riverside stroll, and the path is very clear and flat which is a plus point for families with small children. If you’d rather take more of a walk to enjoy the Peak District countryside and arrive in Dovedale along the way, there are a few good locations to start. For example, the River Dove flows through Milldale, which is a great starting point for the walk down through Dovedale to the stepping stones, as well as Wolfscote Dale and Beresford Dale.  Here there are also a network of footpaths and walks either along the river or over the surrounding countryside.
Thorpe
Dovedale is known for the River Dove and it’s impressive limestone ravines, but the most iconic part of a trip to Dovedale has to be the picturesque stepping stones… Arriving at the nearby car park, where you can also be tempted by snacks and refreshments, it’s just a short walk up and across a wooden bridge to get to the River Dove, where you can look up onto Thorpe Cloud. Thorpe Cloud is an isolated limestone hill, also known as a reef knoll, which sits between the villages of Ilam and Thorpe and lies right on the border between Derbyshire and Staffordshire. It’s highest point has an elevation of 287 metres, which is quite a quick and steep ascent, but one with lots of hike-worthy views across the Staffordshire and Derbyshire countryside once you’re at the top. If you are planning on walking to the top of Thorpe Cloud do remember to bring a good pair of walking boots with you, as the way down the hill can sometimes be a tad tricky. Following the River Dove up towards the stepping stones you can cross and climb to the top of Thorpe Cloud, giving fantastic panoramic views of the Peak District. For a more family friendly walk, you can continue up passed Thorpe Cloud and carry on up along the river. There’s lots of great wildlife and woodland to explore along this riverside stroll, and the path is very clear and flat which is a plus point for families with small children. If you’d rather take more of a walk to enjoy the Peak District countryside and arrive in Dovedale along the way, there are a few good locations to start. For example, the River Dove flows through Milldale, which is a great starting point for the walk down through Dovedale to the stepping stones, as well as Wolfscote Dale and Beresford Dale.  Here there are also a network of footpaths and walks either along the river or over the surrounding countryside.
86
habitants recommandent
Bakewell
86
habitants recommandent
Developed as one of the country's first tourist destinations, Matlock Bath in Derbyshire retains much of the character and interest that impressed early visitors. 1.5 miles south of the town of Matlock, on the busy A6, Matlock Bath is set in the beautiful gorge of the river Derwent, with attractive riverside gardens, wooded hillsides and rocky limestone crags. A popular tourist destination since the late 17th Century when the spa waters were discovered, its' heyday was in Victorian, times when it became known as "Little Switzerland" by the poet, Lord Byron. A popular destination for families, bikers and fun seekers, there are plenty of things to do and see. There is wide a variety of accommodation available for overnight stays and with good transport links it is a popular destination for a day trip. The Matlock Bath Illuminations are a popular feature from September to the end of October, when the riverside is decorated and the cliffs floodlit to create a magical scene of colour. At weekends there are parades of decorated boats, entertainments and, on certain dates, firework displays. Things to do; An exciting cable car ride takes you up to The Heights of Abraham, where the wooded country park is crowned with the Victoria Prospect Tower. The Great Rutland and Masson Caverns are former lead mines that have been adapted as show caves. The Grand Pavilion houses a Tourist Point and the Peak District Mining Museum. For youngsters, the theme park of Gulliver's offers hours of fun and enjoyment. There is also an aquarium and a photographic museum in the village. The Riverside Gardens and Lovers Walks offer gentle strolls away from the crowds, and nearby High Tor affords spectacular views from its lofty summit. The Derwent Valley Heritage Trail runs through the village. Half a mile south of the village is the shopping complex and working textile museum at Masson Mills. There are lots of places to eat and drink and the village has a variety of gift shops. The weekends over lots of people showing off there motorbikes and stunning cars.
25
habitants recommandent
Matlock Bath
25
habitants recommandent
Developed as one of the country's first tourist destinations, Matlock Bath in Derbyshire retains much of the character and interest that impressed early visitors. 1.5 miles south of the town of Matlock, on the busy A6, Matlock Bath is set in the beautiful gorge of the river Derwent, with attractive riverside gardens, wooded hillsides and rocky limestone crags. A popular tourist destination since the late 17th Century when the spa waters were discovered, its' heyday was in Victorian, times when it became known as "Little Switzerland" by the poet, Lord Byron. A popular destination for families, bikers and fun seekers, there are plenty of things to do and see. There is wide a variety of accommodation available for overnight stays and with good transport links it is a popular destination for a day trip. The Matlock Bath Illuminations are a popular feature from September to the end of October, when the riverside is decorated and the cliffs floodlit to create a magical scene of colour. At weekends there are parades of decorated boats, entertainments and, on certain dates, firework displays. Things to do; An exciting cable car ride takes you up to The Heights of Abraham, where the wooded country park is crowned with the Victoria Prospect Tower. The Great Rutland and Masson Caverns are former lead mines that have been adapted as show caves. The Grand Pavilion houses a Tourist Point and the Peak District Mining Museum. For youngsters, the theme park of Gulliver's offers hours of fun and enjoyment. There is also an aquarium and a photographic museum in the village. The Riverside Gardens and Lovers Walks offer gentle strolls away from the crowds, and nearby High Tor affords spectacular views from its lofty summit. The Derwent Valley Heritage Trail runs through the village. Half a mile south of the village is the shopping complex and working textile museum at Masson Mills. There are lots of places to eat and drink and the village has a variety of gift shops. The weekends over lots of people showing off there motorbikes and stunning cars.
Elegant Buxton has been welcoming visitors to enjoy its natural thermal springs and superb setting 300 metres above sea level since Roman times. Known then as Aquae Arnemetiae, or the Spa of the Goddess of the Grove, its fortunes are currently reviving thanks to the restoration of its Grade I listed centrepiece, The Crescent, as a five-star hotel and spa. When the hotel opens, the town's  famous thermal water, which rises from the earth at a constant temperature of 28 degrees C (82 degrees F), will be used again for spa treatments for the first time in decades. But there's much more to the highest market town in England than its most famous brand. Buxton is deservedly renowned for its Georgian and Victorian architecture - much of it linked with the 5th Duke of Devonshire's ambitions to create a spa town to rival Bath back in the 18th century. Among its finest gems are the striking Devonshire Dome, which has a larger span than St Paul's Cathedral, was built by the Duke of Devonshire as stables to complement The Crescent, became a hospital and is now a university. Another masterpiece is the exquisite Edwardian Opera House, home of internationally-renowned Buxton Festival and a host of other festivals, theatre, music and comedy shows throughout the year. Close by is the historic Old Hall Hotel, where ill-fated Mary Queen of Scots was held captive in the 16th century, while a short walk leads to mysterious Poole's Cavern. Visitors today also appreciate the beautifully-landscaped and restored Pavilion Gardens, with its formal borders, lawns, play areas and family-friendly cafe and shop. Shoppers can count on the best of independent retailers and High Street brands at The Springs Shopping Centre, Cavendish Arcade and The Old Court House, plus a choice selection of cafés, tea rooms and restaurants for lunch, afternoon tea and dinner.
57
habitants recommandent
Buxton
57
habitants recommandent
Elegant Buxton has been welcoming visitors to enjoy its natural thermal springs and superb setting 300 metres above sea level since Roman times. Known then as Aquae Arnemetiae, or the Spa of the Goddess of the Grove, its fortunes are currently reviving thanks to the restoration of its Grade I listed centrepiece, The Crescent, as a five-star hotel and spa. When the hotel opens, the town's  famous thermal water, which rises from the earth at a constant temperature of 28 degrees C (82 degrees F), will be used again for spa treatments for the first time in decades. But there's much more to the highest market town in England than its most famous brand. Buxton is deservedly renowned for its Georgian and Victorian architecture - much of it linked with the 5th Duke of Devonshire's ambitions to create a spa town to rival Bath back in the 18th century. Among its finest gems are the striking Devonshire Dome, which has a larger span than St Paul's Cathedral, was built by the Duke of Devonshire as stables to complement The Crescent, became a hospital and is now a university. Another masterpiece is the exquisite Edwardian Opera House, home of internationally-renowned Buxton Festival and a host of other festivals, theatre, music and comedy shows throughout the year. Close by is the historic Old Hall Hotel, where ill-fated Mary Queen of Scots was held captive in the 16th century, while a short walk leads to mysterious Poole's Cavern. Visitors today also appreciate the beautifully-landscaped and restored Pavilion Gardens, with its formal borders, lawns, play areas and family-friendly cafe and shop. Shoppers can count on the best of independent retailers and High Street brands at The Springs Shopping Centre, Cavendish Arcade and The Old Court House, plus a choice selection of cafés, tea rooms and restaurants for lunch, afternoon tea and dinner.
Take a trip back in time to the 1760s at this spectacular Neo-classical mansion, framed by historic parkland. Designed for lavish entertaining and displaying an extensive collection of paintings, sculpture and original furnishings, Kedleston is a stunning example of the work of architect Robert Adam. The Curzon family have lived at the Hall since the 12th century and continue to live here. Lord Curzon's Eastern Museum is a treasure trove of fascinating objects acquired on his travels in Asia and while Viceroy of India (1899 to 1905). Used as a key location for The Duchess, the recent Hollywood blockbuster. kedleston hall is a short drive from poppy cottage this place needs to be seen. owned by the National Trust.
Kedleston
Take a trip back in time to the 1760s at this spectacular Neo-classical mansion, framed by historic parkland. Designed for lavish entertaining and displaying an extensive collection of paintings, sculpture and original furnishings, Kedleston is a stunning example of the work of architect Robert Adam. The Curzon family have lived at the Hall since the 12th century and continue to live here. Lord Curzon's Eastern Museum is a treasure trove of fascinating objects acquired on his travels in Asia and while Viceroy of India (1899 to 1905). Used as a key location for The Duchess, the recent Hollywood blockbuster. kedleston hall is a short drive from poppy cottage this place needs to be seen. owned by the National Trust.
Haddon Hall is part of the National Trust this is a stunning place to walk around lots of history great for the kids plenty to do.
67
habitants recommandent
Haddon Hall
67
habitants recommandent
Haddon Hall is part of the National Trust this is a stunning place to walk around lots of history great for the kids plenty to do.
fun day out
Alton Towers is a must for all adults and all children if you've never been it's a must go you can get some great offers online so shop around
80
habitants recommandent
Alton Towers
80
habitants recommandent
Alton Towers is a must for all adults and all children if you've never been it's a must go you can get some great offers online so shop around
Alton Towers Waterpark
Alton Towers Resort is the UK’s number one theme park and is home to some of the world’s most iconic rides, from Nemesis to The Smiler. Set around the historic Towers Estate within 800 acres of stunning countryside, the resort has been attracting visitors from across the country since the gardens were first opened in 1924. From the fun and thrills of the theme park, the resort provides a range of attractions for the whole family to enjoy.
Alton Towers
Farley Farley Lane
Alton Towers Resort is the UK’s number one theme park and is home to some of the world’s most iconic rides, from Nemesis to The Smiler. Set around the historic Towers Estate within 800 acres of stunning countryside, the resort has been attracting visitors from across the country since the gardens were first opened in 1924. From the fun and thrills of the theme park, the resort provides a range of attractions for the whole family to enjoy.
Gulliver's Kingdom is in the heart of Matlock Bath great for the smaller kids
24
habitants recommandent
Gulliver's Kingdom
24
habitants recommandent
Gulliver's Kingdom is in the heart of Matlock Bath great for the smaller kids
sight seeing
Chatsworth, home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, is set in the heart of the Peak District in Derbyshire, on the banks of the river Derwent. Home of the Cavendish family since the 1550s, it has evolved through the centuries to reflect the tastes, passions and interests of succeeding generations. Chatsworth House has over 30 rooms to explore, from the magnificent Painted Hall, to the family-used chapel, regal State Rooms and beautiful Sculpture Gallery. Chatsworth also houses the Devonshire Collection, one of Europe's most significant art collections, which is continually added to, encompassing Old Masters to contemporary ceramics and artefacts from Ancient Egypt to cutting edge modern sculpture. Each year Chatsworth hosts a number of special events including the Horse Trials, Country Fair and Christmas market; and from November the lower floors of the house are transformed for the annual Christmas displays. In addition to the busy events programme, each year Chatsworth also hosts a number of special exhibitions included with admission. In addition to the headline exhibition, every autumn the Chatsworth Garden hosts Sotheby's Beyond Limits sculpture exhibition, as well as a rolling programme of showcasing Old Master Drawings which continues through the year. The estate also offers holiday cottages, hotels, shops and restaurants, including the award winning Chatsworth Estate Farm shop in the village of Pilsley, approximately 1.5 miles from Chatsworth House. Garden 105 acres of stunning gardens, miles of footpaths, extravagant water features, outdoor art exhibitions, surprises at every turn, rose, cottage, sensory and kitchen gardens, and magnificent views of the park. Gift shops Our shops have a wide selection of beautiful and exclusive products inspired by different aspects of Chatsworth. The gift shops provide hours of delight and retail therapy. Farmyard and Adventure Playground In our working farmyard you can meet and learn about our friendly animals, not to mention milking demonstrations, trailer rides, a fun-packed adventure playground and free seasonal activities. Farmyard cafe Offering family friendly food with freshly made sandwiches, cakes and a range of pasties, you'll find everything you need to refuel during a fun filled day on the farm. Better access for all for visitors to Chatsworth House itself: Chatsworth has always prided itself on the welcome we offer all visitors. Now we are able to offer full lift access to all floors of the historic building for the first time, ensuring that visitors using wheelchairs are able to share the same experience as other visitors, and see everything the house has to offer. The Chatsworth team are always ready to help you plan your visit; call us on 01246 565300 to ensure you have the access support you need
19
habitants recommandent
Chatsworth
19
habitants recommandent
Chatsworth, home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, is set in the heart of the Peak District in Derbyshire, on the banks of the river Derwent. Home of the Cavendish family since the 1550s, it has evolved through the centuries to reflect the tastes, passions and interests of succeeding generations. Chatsworth House has over 30 rooms to explore, from the magnificent Painted Hall, to the family-used chapel, regal State Rooms and beautiful Sculpture Gallery. Chatsworth also houses the Devonshire Collection, one of Europe's most significant art collections, which is continually added to, encompassing Old Masters to contemporary ceramics and artefacts from Ancient Egypt to cutting edge modern sculpture. Each year Chatsworth hosts a number of special events including the Horse Trials, Country Fair and Christmas market; and from November the lower floors of the house are transformed for the annual Christmas displays. In addition to the busy events programme, each year Chatsworth also hosts a number of special exhibitions included with admission. In addition to the headline exhibition, every autumn the Chatsworth Garden hosts Sotheby's Beyond Limits sculpture exhibition, as well as a rolling programme of showcasing Old Master Drawings which continues through the year. The estate also offers holiday cottages, hotels, shops and restaurants, including the award winning Chatsworth Estate Farm shop in the village of Pilsley, approximately 1.5 miles from Chatsworth House. Garden 105 acres of stunning gardens, miles of footpaths, extravagant water features, outdoor art exhibitions, surprises at every turn, rose, cottage, sensory and kitchen gardens, and magnificent views of the park. Gift shops Our shops have a wide selection of beautiful and exclusive products inspired by different aspects of Chatsworth. The gift shops provide hours of delight and retail therapy. Farmyard and Adventure Playground In our working farmyard you can meet and learn about our friendly animals, not to mention milking demonstrations, trailer rides, a fun-packed adventure playground and free seasonal activities. Farmyard cafe Offering family friendly food with freshly made sandwiches, cakes and a range of pasties, you'll find everything you need to refuel during a fun filled day on the farm. Better access for all for visitors to Chatsworth House itself: Chatsworth has always prided itself on the welcome we offer all visitors. Now we are able to offer full lift access to all floors of the historic building for the first time, ensuring that visitors using wheelchairs are able to share the same experience as other visitors, and see everything the house has to offer. The Chatsworth team are always ready to help you plan your visit; call us on 01246 565300 to ensure you have the access support you need
Let us show you around a world of contrasting natural beauty, with moors and dales, rivers, springs and caverns and at the heart of it all, there are loads of things to do in the Peak District National Park and Derbyshire. The area is known and loved by many for its breath-taking views, bustling market towns and pretty villages, historic houses, famous attractions and hundreds of traditional events, such as the unique Derbyshire custom of Well Dressing - see all of What's On in the area, here! From the high, moorland plateaus in the north, to the steep-sided, deep dales and rolling green hills in the south of the area, the Peak District & Derbyshire has just about any landscape you can imagine in Britain, making it one of the finest areas in the country to go walking. Couple the fantastic scenery with amazing local Food & Drink, the Peak District will sure enough become one of your favourite destinations! So, if you want to enjoy some time exploring all that the Peak District & Derbyshire has to offer, book your holiday accommodation here. As for events, well, we know how to throw a party! Fabulously vintage, award-winning Eroica Britannia is very quickly gaining a reputation as one of the 'must visit' events of the year with its shabby chic look, party atmosphere and of course excellent cycle ride through the stunning Peak District. What more could you ask for? During the summer you'll catch a country fair on nearly any weekend, from Hope Show, Bakewell Show and Chatsworth Country Fair.  And in the Autumn, enjoy glistening displays and family fun at the Matlock Bath Illuminations.  Our attractions are pretty top-notch too! Dangle over a ravine in a cable car as you ascend to The Heights of Abraham, hop on-board an old-style tram at Crich Tramway Village, home to the National Tramway Museum, get up close and personal with nature at Peak Wildlife Park or scare yourself silly on white-knuckle ride at Alton Towers Resort!
Derbyshire Dales District
Let us show you around a world of contrasting natural beauty, with moors and dales, rivers, springs and caverns and at the heart of it all, there are loads of things to do in the Peak District National Park and Derbyshire. The area is known and loved by many for its breath-taking views, bustling market towns and pretty villages, historic houses, famous attractions and hundreds of traditional events, such as the unique Derbyshire custom of Well Dressing - see all of What's On in the area, here! From the high, moorland plateaus in the north, to the steep-sided, deep dales and rolling green hills in the south of the area, the Peak District & Derbyshire has just about any landscape you can imagine in Britain, making it one of the finest areas in the country to go walking. Couple the fantastic scenery with amazing local Food & Drink, the Peak District will sure enough become one of your favourite destinations! So, if you want to enjoy some time exploring all that the Peak District & Derbyshire has to offer, book your holiday accommodation here. As for events, well, we know how to throw a party! Fabulously vintage, award-winning Eroica Britannia is very quickly gaining a reputation as one of the 'must visit' events of the year with its shabby chic look, party atmosphere and of course excellent cycle ride through the stunning Peak District. What more could you ask for? During the summer you'll catch a country fair on nearly any weekend, from Hope Show, Bakewell Show and Chatsworth Country Fair.  And in the Autumn, enjoy glistening displays and family fun at the Matlock Bath Illuminations.  Our attractions are pretty top-notch too! Dangle over a ravine in a cable car as you ascend to The Heights of Abraham, hop on-board an old-style tram at Crich Tramway Village, home to the National Tramway Museum, get up close and personal with nature at Peak Wildlife Park or scare yourself silly on white-knuckle ride at Alton Towers Resort!
Crich is a pretty Derbyshire village on the edge of the Derbyshire Dales. It is the home of the Crich Tramway Village and Crich Stand - the memorial to the Worcesteshire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment. Crich was also the setting for fictional village of Cardale which featured in the popular TV series 'Peak Practice
Crich
Crich is a pretty Derbyshire village on the edge of the Derbyshire Dales. It is the home of the Crich Tramway Village and Crich Stand - the memorial to the Worcesteshire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment. Crich was also the setting for fictional village of Cardale which featured in the popular TV series 'Peak Practice
Carsington Water has everything you need for a great day out - and best of all most facilities are free! On site shops cater for everybody, these include our new outdoor clothes shop 'Water Rail'. The Gallery Cafe for quick snacks, Main Sail Restaurant and barbecuing.
Carsington
Carsington Water has everything you need for a great day out - and best of all most facilities are free! On site shops cater for everybody, these include our new outdoor clothes shop 'Water Rail'. The Gallery Cafe for quick snacks, Main Sail Restaurant and barbecuing.
Step back in time in the atmospheric setting of Eyam, known to visitors and residents alike as the 'Plague Village'. Immerse yourself in the incredible story of its unselfish villagers, who sealed themselves off from the outside world in the 17th century to prevent the deadly disease from spreading to neighbouring communities. Trace the fascinating tale of how the Plague was brought to the White Peak village in a bolt of infected cloth from London in 1665, taking in key locations such as the church of St Lawrence, Plague Cottages, Cucklet Delf and - just outside the village - the Riley Graves and Mompesson's Well. You can also find out more at Eyam Museum, open from March to November. In the heart of the village you'll find historic 17th century Eyam Hall, which was built just six years after the Plague subsided and was home to the Wright family for more than 11 generations. Now managed by the National Trust, Eyam Hall is a fine example of a Jacobean manor house with its embroideries, engravings and library, plus walled garden with seasonal borders, vegetable plots and open, spacious lawns. Next door you'll find a courtyard with a craft centre selling everything from Hartington cheese to handcrafted jewellery, while The Buttery serves light refreshments and lunch. Opposite the hall are the village stocks, mainly used by Eyam's Barmote Court to regulate the wrong-doings of local lead miners. The nearby church of St Lawrence dates back to Saxon times and has an original font and Norman pillars, thought to rest on Saxon foundations. The oldest and most striking feature of the churchyard is its eighth-century Celtic Cross. One of the best preserved examples of its kind in the country, it is decorated with a mixture of Christian and pagan symbols and may have once been a wayside preaching cross.
16
habitants recommandent
Eyam
16
habitants recommandent
Step back in time in the atmospheric setting of Eyam, known to visitors and residents alike as the 'Plague Village'. Immerse yourself in the incredible story of its unselfish villagers, who sealed themselves off from the outside world in the 17th century to prevent the deadly disease from spreading to neighbouring communities. Trace the fascinating tale of how the Plague was brought to the White Peak village in a bolt of infected cloth from London in 1665, taking in key locations such as the church of St Lawrence, Plague Cottages, Cucklet Delf and - just outside the village - the Riley Graves and Mompesson's Well. You can also find out more at Eyam Museum, open from March to November. In the heart of the village you'll find historic 17th century Eyam Hall, which was built just six years after the Plague subsided and was home to the Wright family for more than 11 generations. Now managed by the National Trust, Eyam Hall is a fine example of a Jacobean manor house with its embroideries, engravings and library, plus walled garden with seasonal borders, vegetable plots and open, spacious lawns. Next door you'll find a courtyard with a craft centre selling everything from Hartington cheese to handcrafted jewellery, while The Buttery serves light refreshments and lunch. Opposite the hall are the village stocks, mainly used by Eyam's Barmote Court to regulate the wrong-doings of local lead miners. The nearby church of St Lawrence dates back to Saxon times and has an original font and Norman pillars, thought to rest on Saxon foundations. The oldest and most striking feature of the churchyard is its eighth-century Celtic Cross. One of the best preserved examples of its kind in the country, it is decorated with a mixture of Christian and pagan symbols and may have once been a wayside preaching cross.
Sudbury Hall and the National Trust Museum of Childhood is two great days out rolled into one. Discover remarkable 17th-century craftsmanship, exquisite plasterwork, wood carvings and classical story-based murals. Meet knowledgeable room hosts and volunteers and be amazed by the grandeur of the Great Staircase, the Long Gallery and the captivating story of this historic house. The Museum of Childhood is a delight for all ages with something for everyone. Get up close with a screen-used Dalek, marvel at props from films like Harry Potter and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and take a moment to reminisce special childhood moments.  Watch your children discovering something new, or relive nostalgic memories. Journey through our collections, create stories, play with toys and share your childhood with others
8
habitants recommandent
Sudbury Hall
8
habitants recommandent
Sudbury Hall and the National Trust Museum of Childhood is two great days out rolled into one. Discover remarkable 17th-century craftsmanship, exquisite plasterwork, wood carvings and classical story-based murals. Meet knowledgeable room hosts and volunteers and be amazed by the grandeur of the Great Staircase, the Long Gallery and the captivating story of this historic house. The Museum of Childhood is a delight for all ages with something for everyone. Get up close with a screen-used Dalek, marvel at props from films like Harry Potter and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and take a moment to reminisce special childhood moments.  Watch your children discovering something new, or relive nostalgic memories. Journey through our collections, create stories, play with toys and share your childhood with others
The Monsal Trail is a traffic free route for walkers, cyclists, horse riders and wheelchair users through some of the Peak District's most spectacular limestone dales. The trail runs along the former Midland Railway line for 8.5 miles between Blackwell Mill, in Chee Dale and Coombs Road, at Bakewell. Most of the route was opened to the public in 1981 but four former railway tunnels had to remain closed due to safety reasons, with public footpaths taking people around them. From 25 May 2011 the four railway tunnels - Headstone Tunnel, Cressbrook Tunnel, Litton Tunnel, Chee Tor Tunnel – will also open for trail users. Each tunnel is about 400 metres long and will be lit during normal daylight hours. Two shorter tunnels - Chee Tor No.2 and Rusher Cutting – already formed part of the Monsal Trail. The public can now experience the full length of the former railway route at their own pace and see breathtaking views at places like Water-cum-Jolly Dale that have remained hidden since the railway closed in 1968. Monsal Trail Tunnels The Monsal Trail tunnels offer one of the most spectacular leisure routes in Britain for cycling, walking and horse riding. It is the first time the public have been able to go through the tunnels since the former Midland Railway Line closed in 1968. Following work by the Peak District National Park Authority – using £2.25 million funding from the Department of Transport – the tunnels have been repaired, resurfaced and lit to form an extension to the existing Monsal Trail. Interpretation explaining the former history of the route has also been installed. Lighting the way Four of the longer tunnels are lit during daylight hours, dawn to dusk, to make them safe to use. They are operated by a light sensor, so in winter when the hours of daylight are less, the lights in the tunnels will switch off earlier in the day - around 4.30pm. If you are using the trail in the afternoon you are advised to take a torch or have bike lights in case you get caught out. If the lights go off because of a power failure there is a two hour emergency back up in place
Monsal Trail
The Monsal Trail is a traffic free route for walkers, cyclists, horse riders and wheelchair users through some of the Peak District's most spectacular limestone dales. The trail runs along the former Midland Railway line for 8.5 miles between Blackwell Mill, in Chee Dale and Coombs Road, at Bakewell. Most of the route was opened to the public in 1981 but four former railway tunnels had to remain closed due to safety reasons, with public footpaths taking people around them. From 25 May 2011 the four railway tunnels - Headstone Tunnel, Cressbrook Tunnel, Litton Tunnel, Chee Tor Tunnel – will also open for trail users. Each tunnel is about 400 metres long and will be lit during normal daylight hours. Two shorter tunnels - Chee Tor No.2 and Rusher Cutting – already formed part of the Monsal Trail. The public can now experience the full length of the former railway route at their own pace and see breathtaking views at places like Water-cum-Jolly Dale that have remained hidden since the railway closed in 1968. Monsal Trail Tunnels The Monsal Trail tunnels offer one of the most spectacular leisure routes in Britain for cycling, walking and horse riding. It is the first time the public have been able to go through the tunnels since the former Midland Railway Line closed in 1968. Following work by the Peak District National Park Authority – using £2.25 million funding from the Department of Transport – the tunnels have been repaired, resurfaced and lit to form an extension to the existing Monsal Trail. Interpretation explaining the former history of the route has also been installed. Lighting the way Four of the longer tunnels are lit during daylight hours, dawn to dusk, to make them safe to use. They are operated by a light sensor, so in winter when the hours of daylight are less, the lights in the tunnels will switch off earlier in the day - around 4.30pm. If you are using the trail in the afternoon you are advised to take a torch or have bike lights in case you get caught out. If the lights go off because of a power failure there is a two hour emergency back up in place
Food Scene
This is our favourite places to eat in Ashbourne gorgeous Sunday dinner.
The Bowling Green Inn
2 North Ave
This is our favourite places to eat in Ashbourne gorgeous Sunday dinner.
Great food and great cocktails in the heart of Ashbourne
The Green Man Royal Hotel
Great food and great cocktails in the heart of Ashbourne
a very warm welcoming country pub in the heart of Ashbourne
The Bridge
33-35 Dig St
a very warm welcoming country pub in the heart of Ashbourne
stunning old pub in the market place in ashbourne very nice food and drinks
The George & Dragon
43 Market Place
stunning old pub in the market place in ashbourne very nice food and drinks
Café Impromptu
14 Church St