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Guidebook for Missoula

Erica

Guidebook for Missoula

Food Scene
Great breakfast and lunch place to eat!
Quiet place with great breakfast and near the river.
39
habitants recommandent
Bernice's Bakery
190 South 3rd Street West
39
habitants recommandent
Quiet place with great breakfast and near the river.
Delicious food for breakfast. Serves a late breakfast for a good brunch menu.
7
habitants recommandent
The Shack Cafe
222 West Main Street
7
habitants recommandent
Delicious food for breakfast. Serves a late breakfast for a good brunch menu.
Delicious breakfast burritos and coffee! Near the Farmers Market in the summer as well as the Clark Fork River Trail.
21
habitants recommandent
Market on Front
201 East Front Street
21
habitants recommandent
Delicious breakfast burritos and coffee! Near the Farmers Market in the summer as well as the Clark Fork River Trail.
Drinks & Nightlife
Sports bar that has great food!
Live music often. Bar/restaurant. Good food and great location downtown.
61
habitants recommandent
Top Hat
134 West Front Street
61
habitants recommandent
Live music often. Bar/restaurant. Good food and great location downtown.
Great for swing and country style dancing!
Sunrise Saloon and Casino
1101 Strand Ave
Great for swing and country style dancing!
Fun place to socialize whether you are solo or with friends!
7
habitants recommandent
Union Club Bar
208 East Main Street
7
habitants recommandent
Fun place to socialize whether you are solo or with friends!
Restaurant/bar near the Clark Fork River Trail.
18
habitants recommandent
Tamarack Brewing Co
231 West Front Street
18
habitants recommandent
Restaurant/bar near the Clark Fork River Trail.
Parks & Nature
River trail in the middle of Missoula.
Quiet, peaceful, and beautiful park. Paved and one off trail from the main path that makes it feel you're far from a city. There is a sand area to watch the river off trail.
18
habitants recommandent
Greenough park
1001 Monroe Street
18
habitants recommandent
Quiet, peaceful, and beautiful park. Paved and one off trail from the main path that makes it feel you're far from a city. There is a sand area to watch the river off trail.
Beautiful and peaceful site, unique to America.
14
habitants recommandent
Ewam and Garden of One Thousand Buddhas
34574 White Coyote Road
14
habitants recommandent
Beautiful and peaceful site, unique to America.
Great views of the Missoula area set in nature.
15
habitants recommandent
Blue Mountain Trailhead (hike & bike)
15
habitants recommandent
Great views of the Missoula area set in nature.
Great place to be immersed in nature. Easy walk with off shoot hiking trails that hug the Rattlesnake River.
32
habitants recommandent
Rattlesnake Trailhead
32
habitants recommandent
Great place to be immersed in nature. Easy walk with off shoot hiking trails that hug the Rattlesnake River.
Fun and beautiful hiking area that is pet friendly.
9
habitants recommandent
Pattee Canyon Recreation Area
9
habitants recommandent
Fun and beautiful hiking area that is pet friendly.
Ski Resort that is closest to Missoula.
17
habitants recommandent
Snowbowl
17
habitants recommandent
Ski Resort that is closest to Missoula.
Beautiful ski resort down the Bitterroot. About 1.5 hours from Missoula. Worth the drive!
13
habitants recommandent
Lost Trail Powder Mountain
9485 US-93
13
habitants recommandent
Beautiful ski resort down the Bitterroot. About 1.5 hours from Missoula. Worth the drive!
Ski resort that is perfect for level!
19
habitants recommandent
Discovery Ski Area
180 Discovery Basin Road
19
habitants recommandent
Ski resort that is perfect for level!
Slow down and walk the Riverfront Trail. At the start of a new day or nearing dusk, the views of the big Montana sky are breathtaking. The river, downtown and skyline all come together on this unique trail running right through the heart of town. Be sure to bring a leash if you have pets!
Riverfront Trail
Slow down and walk the Riverfront Trail. At the start of a new day or nearing dusk, the views of the big Montana sky are breathtaking. The river, downtown and skyline all come together on this unique trail running right through the heart of town. Be sure to bring a leash if you have pets!
Sites with Missoula Recommendations
Check out these sites for places to explore in Missoula.
14
habitants recommandent
Missoula
14
habitants recommandent
Check out these sites for places to explore in Missoula.
Montana Jewels
Must see sites in Montana
Boundless opportunities to explore, hike, and backpack with lots of wildlife, activities, and siteseeing.
199
habitants recommandent
Parc national de Glacier
199
habitants recommandent
Boundless opportunities to explore, hike, and backpack with lots of wildlife, activities, and siteseeing.
"One of the most enduring myths of Yellowstone National Park involves its beginning. As the myth goes, in 1870, explorers gathered around a campfire at the junction of two pristine rivers, overshadowed by the towering cliffs of the Madison Plateau. They discussed what they had seen during their exploration and realized that this land of fire and ice and wild animals needed to be preserved. Thus, the legend goes, the idea of Yellowstone National Park was born. Though it is a myth, the explorers were real and their crowning achievement was helping to save Yellowstone from private development. They promoted a park bill in Washington in late 1871 and early 1872 that drew upon the precedent of the Yosemite Act of 1864, which reserved Yosemite Valley from settlement and entrusted it to the care of the state of California. To permanently close to settlement an expanse of the public domain the size of Yellowstone would depart from the established policy of transferring public lands to private ownership. But the wonders of Yellowstone—shown through Jackson’s photographs, Moran’s paintings, and Elliot’s sketches—had caught the imagination of Congress. Thanks to their continued reports and the work of explorers and artists who followed, the United States Congress established Yellowstone National Park in 1872. On March 1, 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the Yellowstone National Park Protection Act into law. The world’s first national park was born. The Yellowstone National Park Protection Act says “the headwaters of the Yellowstone River … is hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or sale … and dedicated and set apart as a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” In an era of expansion, the federal government had the foresight to set aside land deemed too valuable to develop." Reference: https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm
192
habitants recommandent
Parc national de Yellowstone
192
habitants recommandent
"One of the most enduring myths of Yellowstone National Park involves its beginning. As the myth goes, in 1870, explorers gathered around a campfire at the junction of two pristine rivers, overshadowed by the towering cliffs of the Madison Plateau. They discussed what they had seen during their exploration and realized that this land of fire and ice and wild animals needed to be preserved. Thus, the legend goes, the idea of Yellowstone National Park was born. Though it is a myth, the explorers were real and their crowning achievement was helping to save Yellowstone from private development. They promoted a park bill in Washington in late 1871 and early 1872 that drew upon the precedent of the Yosemite Act of 1864, which reserved Yosemite Valley from settlement and entrusted it to the care of the state of California. To permanently close to settlement an expanse of the public domain the size of Yellowstone would depart from the established policy of transferring public lands to private ownership. But the wonders of Yellowstone—shown through Jackson’s photographs, Moran’s paintings, and Elliot’s sketches—had caught the imagination of Congress. Thanks to their continued reports and the work of explorers and artists who followed, the United States Congress established Yellowstone National Park in 1872. On March 1, 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the Yellowstone National Park Protection Act into law. The world’s first national park was born. The Yellowstone National Park Protection Act says “the headwaters of the Yellowstone River … is hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or sale … and dedicated and set apart as a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” In an era of expansion, the federal government had the foresight to set aside land deemed too valuable to develop." Reference: https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm
Great rural town on Flathead Lake. Tons of fishing and water activities.
Polson
Great rural town on Flathead Lake. Tons of fishing and water activities.
"Leave your stress behind! You will find this spectacular 1.6 million acre forest in southwest Montana and Idaho to be a priceless national heritage. Half of the forest is dedicated to the largest expanse of continuous pristine wilderness in the lower 48 states -- the Selway Bitterroot, Frank Church River of No Return, and the Anaconda Pintler. Much of its beauty can be attributed to the heavily glaciated, rugged peaks of the Bitterroot Range. Drainages carved by glaciers form steep canyons that open into the valley floor. The abundance of natural resources offers a wide range of opportunities for recreation, grazing, wildlife, fisheries, timber, and minerals. Come enjoy the magnificent mountains, the serenity of wilderness, the miracle of spring flowers, majestic big game, and the sounds of birds here in our land of multiple uses." Reference: https://www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot
Bitterroot National Forest
"Leave your stress behind! You will find this spectacular 1.6 million acre forest in southwest Montana and Idaho to be a priceless national heritage. Half of the forest is dedicated to the largest expanse of continuous pristine wilderness in the lower 48 states -- the Selway Bitterroot, Frank Church River of No Return, and the Anaconda Pintler. Much of its beauty can be attributed to the heavily glaciated, rugged peaks of the Bitterroot Range. Drainages carved by glaciers form steep canyons that open into the valley floor. The abundance of natural resources offers a wide range of opportunities for recreation, grazing, wildlife, fisheries, timber, and minerals. Come enjoy the magnificent mountains, the serenity of wilderness, the miracle of spring flowers, majestic big game, and the sounds of birds here in our land of multiple uses." Reference: https://www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot
"The Mission Mountain Range is the gateway to the Mission Mountain Wilderness Area, a 73,877-acre paradise for hiking, camping and fishing. An area of outstanding scenic beauty--rugged, snowcapped peaks, several small glaciers, alpine lakes, meadows and clear cold streams. Popularly known as the American Alps, the overpowering western face of the Missions pierces the sky almost 7,000 feet above the valley floor. The apex of the range is a glacier-studded 9,280-foot McDonald Peak in the rugged south, where a dozen other summits rise above 9,000 feet. Permanent snow fields feed hundreds of gem-like tarns (glacier formed lakes) in one of the highest densities of alpine lakes in the Northern Rockies. Waterfalls are abundant, with the best known being the 1,000-foot plunges of Elizabeth and Mission Falls. In 1979 the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes designated 89,500 acres of privately owned tribal lands along the western slopes as Wilderness. This is the only Tribal Wilderness in the nation to be established by the actual tribe. In the words of the Mission Mountains Committee: 'These mountains belong to our children, and when our children grow old they will belong to their children. In this way and for this reason these mountain are sacred.' The west side Tribal Wilderness is managed with a priority for wildlife. Each summer grizzlies gather on the snow fields of McDonald Peak to feast on swarms of cutworm moths and ladybugs. In order to avoid displacing these great bears, the tribe closes about 12,000 acres to all public use from mid-July to October, The closed area is part of a larger trail less region that serves to discourage humans from entering the grizzly's home during a critical time. If you are not a tribal member, and are between the ages of 18 and 64, you must obtain and carry a tribal recreation permit, which entitles you to hike, fish, camp and enjoy the Wilderness as well as other Flathead Reservation lands that are open to recreation. The permits are available at a number of stores within and near the reservation communities of Missoula, Kalispell, Seeley Lake, and Thompson Falls. Despite the permits, tribal managers downplay regulations in favor of education. If people understand the need for no-trace camping and grizzly bear closures around McDonald Peak, enforcement problems will be minimal. Along with the distinguished grizzly bear population, mountain goats, black bears, elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer are also found in the Wilderness. Some mountain lions, martens, minks, bobcats, lynx, weasels and wolverines may be occasionally seen along with many birds, including bald and golden eagles, common loons, and woodpeckers." Reference: https://www.visitmt.com/listings/general/wilderness-area/mission-mountains-wilderness-complex.html
Mission Mountains View Point
"The Mission Mountain Range is the gateway to the Mission Mountain Wilderness Area, a 73,877-acre paradise for hiking, camping and fishing. An area of outstanding scenic beauty--rugged, snowcapped peaks, several small glaciers, alpine lakes, meadows and clear cold streams. Popularly known as the American Alps, the overpowering western face of the Missions pierces the sky almost 7,000 feet above the valley floor. The apex of the range is a glacier-studded 9,280-foot McDonald Peak in the rugged south, where a dozen other summits rise above 9,000 feet. Permanent snow fields feed hundreds of gem-like tarns (glacier formed lakes) in one of the highest densities of alpine lakes in the Northern Rockies. Waterfalls are abundant, with the best known being the 1,000-foot plunges of Elizabeth and Mission Falls. In 1979 the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes designated 89,500 acres of privately owned tribal lands along the western slopes as Wilderness. This is the only Tribal Wilderness in the nation to be established by the actual tribe. In the words of the Mission Mountains Committee: 'These mountains belong to our children, and when our children grow old they will belong to their children. In this way and for this reason these mountain are sacred.' The west side Tribal Wilderness is managed with a priority for wildlife. Each summer grizzlies gather on the snow fields of McDonald Peak to feast on swarms of cutworm moths and ladybugs. In order to avoid displacing these great bears, the tribe closes about 12,000 acres to all public use from mid-July to October, The closed area is part of a larger trail less region that serves to discourage humans from entering the grizzly's home during a critical time. If you are not a tribal member, and are between the ages of 18 and 64, you must obtain and carry a tribal recreation permit, which entitles you to hike, fish, camp and enjoy the Wilderness as well as other Flathead Reservation lands that are open to recreation. The permits are available at a number of stores within and near the reservation communities of Missoula, Kalispell, Seeley Lake, and Thompson Falls. Despite the permits, tribal managers downplay regulations in favor of education. If people understand the need for no-trace camping and grizzly bear closures around McDonald Peak, enforcement problems will be minimal. Along with the distinguished grizzly bear population, mountain goats, black bears, elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer are also found in the Wilderness. Some mountain lions, martens, minks, bobcats, lynx, weasels and wolverines may be occasionally seen along with many birds, including bald and golden eagles, common loons, and woodpeckers." Reference: https://www.visitmt.com/listings/general/wilderness-area/mission-mountains-wilderness-complex.html