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Guidebook for Roma

Valentina

Guidebook for Roma

Food Scene
Gran Forno Lucarelli
22 Via Satrico
8
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Osteria 22quattro
52 Via Vetulonia
8
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Ice Cream shop
Gelateria Kappadue
51 Via Britannia
Ice Cream shop
Very Famous Ice Cream Shop
9
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Il Gelato di San Crispino
56 Via Acaia
9
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Very Famous Ice Cream Shop
Drinks & Nightlife
16
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Sacco Bistrot
70 Via Gallia
16
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Arts & Culture
A unique park in the world http://www.parcoappiaantica.it/
109
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Parc régional de l'Appia antica
42 Via Appia Antica
109
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A unique park in the world http://www.parcoappiaantica.it/
The Baths of Caracalla (Italian: Terme di Caracalla) in Rome, Italy, were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla.[1] Chris Scarre provides a slightly longer construction period 211–217 AD.[2] They would have had to install over 2,000 tons of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. Records show that the idea for the baths were drawn up by Septimius Severus, and merely completed or opened in the lifetime of Caracalla.[3] This would allow for a longer construction timeframe. They are today a tourist attraction.
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Baths of Caracalla
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The Baths of Caracalla (Italian: Terme di Caracalla) in Rome, Italy, were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla.[1] Chris Scarre provides a slightly longer construction period 211–217 AD.[2] They would have had to install over 2,000 tons of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. Records show that the idea for the baths were drawn up by Septimius Severus, and merely completed or opened in the lifetime of Caracalla.[3] This would allow for a longer construction timeframe. They are today a tourist attraction.
The Circus Maximus (Latin for greatest or largest circus, in Italian Circo Massimo) is an ancient Roman chariot racing stadium and mass entertainment venue located in Rome, Italy. Situated in the valley between the Aventine and Palatine hills, it was the first and largest stadium in ancient Rome and its later Empire. It measured 621 m (2,037 ft) in length and 118 m (387 ft) in width and could accommodate over 150,000 spectators.[1] In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.
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Circo Massimo
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The Circus Maximus (Latin for greatest or largest circus, in Italian Circo Massimo) is an ancient Roman chariot racing stadium and mass entertainment venue located in Rome, Italy. Situated in the valley between the Aventine and Palatine hills, it was the first and largest stadium in ancient Rome and its later Empire. It measured 621 m (2,037 ft) in length and 118 m (387 ft) in width and could accommodate over 150,000 spectators.[1] In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.
The real name of this monumental gate, one of the largest and best conserved in the Aurelian Walls, was Appia, from the name of the important arterial road which it opened out onto. In the Middle Ages the name was corrupted into Daccia and Dazza, over which the name Porta S. Sebastiano eventually prevailed, in honour of the Christian martyr buried in the church on the Via Appia not far from the walls.
Porta S. Sebastiano
The real name of this monumental gate, one of the largest and best conserved in the Aurelian Walls, was Appia, from the name of the important arterial road which it opened out onto. In the Middle Ages the name was corrupted into Daccia and Dazza, over which the name Porta S. Sebastiano eventually prevailed, in honour of the Christian martyr buried in the church on the Via Appia not far from the walls.
On the Celio hill, the Roman Houses (Case Romane) have recently been restored and re-opened to the public, along with a room displaying archaeological finds. Church of SS. Giovanni e Paolo, above the Roman Houses Traditionally the church of SS Giovanni e Paolo stands on the site of the dwelling of the two saints, John and Paul, who were Roman military officers put to death for their Christian faith. Later the property is believed to have belonged to a Christian senator called Pammachius, who converted his home into a church. In the nineteenth century, an enterprising monk excavated underneath the church, and found a series of decorated rooms dating back to the third century. Archaeological investigations have assigned various dates to the remains here; which belong to different stages of the site's development. Once a number of humbler dwellings and shops stood here, before the buildings were incorporated into a more sumptuous villa, whose frescoed walls can still be seen. Like the more famous Domus Aurea, the rooms here are now underground, and it takes some imagination to imagine the spaces as they were before they were covered by later buildings. The wall-paintings, however, are a vivid reminder of times past. Ranging from fake marble painted on stucco to elaborate arrangements of flowers and garlanded animals, these are the principal attraction of the site and are well-worth the entrance fee. The Antiquarium houses archaeological finds from the houses and the church, including some of the early Christian art that was later removed to make way for new fashions. There is also a collection of Islamic pottery - interestingly, it was these colourful plates which once decorated the church's medieval belltower (later replaced by copies).
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Case Romane del Celio
snc Clivo di Scauro
6
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On the Celio hill, the Roman Houses (Case Romane) have recently been restored and re-opened to the public, along with a room displaying archaeological finds. Church of SS. Giovanni e Paolo, above the Roman Houses Traditionally the church of SS Giovanni e Paolo stands on the site of the dwelling of the two saints, John and Paul, who were Roman military officers put to death for their Christian faith. Later the property is believed to have belonged to a Christian senator called Pammachius, who converted his home into a church. In the nineteenth century, an enterprising monk excavated underneath the church, and found a series of decorated rooms dating back to the third century. Archaeological investigations have assigned various dates to the remains here; which belong to different stages of the site's development. Once a number of humbler dwellings and shops stood here, before the buildings were incorporated into a more sumptuous villa, whose frescoed walls can still be seen. Like the more famous Domus Aurea, the rooms here are now underground, and it takes some imagination to imagine the spaces as they were before they were covered by later buildings. The wall-paintings, however, are a vivid reminder of times past. Ranging from fake marble painted on stucco to elaborate arrangements of flowers and garlanded animals, these are the principal attraction of the site and are well-worth the entrance fee. The Antiquarium houses archaeological finds from the houses and the church, including some of the early Christian art that was later removed to make way for new fashions. There is also a collection of Islamic pottery - interestingly, it was these colourful plates which once decorated the church's medieval belltower (later replaced by copies).
The Archbasilica of St John Lateran (Italian: Arcibasilica Papale di San Giovanni in Laterano), commonly known as St John Lateran Archbasilica, St John Lateran Basilica, St John Lateran, or just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of Rome and serves as the ecclesiastical seat of the Roman Pontiff. It is the oldest and takes precedence among the four Papal Basilicas (all of which are located in Rome), being the oldest church in the West and having the cathedra of the Roman Pontiff.[2][3] It has the title of ecumenical mother church among the Catholic faithful. The current archpriest is Agostino Vallini, Cardinal Vicar General for the Diocese of Rome.[4] The President of the French Republic, currently François Hollande, is ex officio the "first and only honorary canon" of the Archbasilica, a title held by the heads of state of France since King Henry IV.
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Basilique Saint-Jean-de-Latran
4 Piazza di S. Giovanni in Laterano
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The Archbasilica of St John Lateran (Italian: Arcibasilica Papale di San Giovanni in Laterano), commonly known as St John Lateran Archbasilica, St John Lateran Basilica, St John Lateran, or just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of Rome and serves as the ecclesiastical seat of the Roman Pontiff. It is the oldest and takes precedence among the four Papal Basilicas (all of which are located in Rome), being the oldest church in the West and having the cathedra of the Roman Pontiff.[2][3] It has the title of ecumenical mother church among the Catholic faithful. The current archpriest is Agostino Vallini, Cardinal Vicar General for the Diocese of Rome.[4] The President of the French Republic, currently François Hollande, is ex officio the "first and only honorary canon" of the Archbasilica, a title held by the heads of state of France since King Henry IV.
Shopping
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Coin
7 Piazzale Appio
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Getting Around
Bus stop 628, 360, 665
Via Satrico
Bus stop 628, 360, 665
Essentials
Supermaket
Simply Market Circonvallazione Appia
190 Circonvallazione Appia
Supermaket
Supermarket
7
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Elite
97/a Via Magnagrecia
7
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Supermarket
Supermarket
Tuodì
32 Via Etruria
Supermarket
Carrefour Express - Supermarket
53 Via Britannia
Fantasie Alimentari
51 Via Acaia